bullous disease

bullous disease

[boo͡l′əs]
any disease marked by eruptions of blisters, or bullae, filled with fluid, on the skin or mucous membranes. An example is pemphigus.

bullous disease

A general term for any dermopathy characterised by the splitting of the epidermis into bullae, often covering large areas of the skin surface.

Aetiology of epidermal/dermal split
Autoimmune, lichenoid, mechanical, spongiotic.

bullous disease

Dermatology Any of a number of conditions characterized by the formation of bullae covering large portions of the skin surface; many BDs are immune-mediated and can be separated based on the location of the lesions. See Bullous pemphigoid, Pemphigus vulgaris.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, key clinical and histopathological differences allow for distinction between these bullous disease subtypes.
Bullous pemphigoid is the most common autoimmune bullous disease, and is usually seen in older ages (1, 2).
As the patient continued to have significant hypoxia and dyspnea, a follow up chest CT two weeks after the initial CT was performed which revealed extensive cavitation versus bullous disease with upper lobe predominance and coarsening of the pulmonary interstitium (Figure 2).
Cicatricial pemphigoid is a chronic, systemic, autoimmune, bullous disease.
Pemphigus vulgaris is the most common autoimmune bullous disease in Northwestern Romania.
Waldman MA, Black DR, Callen JP: Vancomycin-induced linear IgA bullous disease presenting as toxic epidermal necrolysis.
Key Words: Autoimmune bullous disease, acantholysis, pemphigus, bullous pemphigod, subepidermal bullous disease
The purpose of cytology in autoimmune bullous diseases is to rapidly distinguish pemphigus from subepidermal bullous disease.
Topics in Section 2 include anatomic abnormalities, benign tumors, bullous diseases, and bacterial and fungal diseases.
Painful oropharyngeal lesions occur in granulomatosis with polyangiitis or Wegener granulomatosis, and autoimmune bullous diseases such as cicatricial pemphigoid and pemphigus vulgaris.
Key Words: Bullous diseases, epidermolysis bullosa, kindler syndrome
The atlas contains about 300 color figures of about 80 patterns of blistering and pustular diseases, including autoimmune bullous diseases, hereditary bullous diseases, bullous diseases due to infections, bullous eruptions in other diseases, and skin diseases with abacterial pustular eruptions.