bulky disease

bulky disease

term used for large tumors or lymph nodes; usually more resistant to conventional therapy.
A term for a cancer with a considerable tumour burden—‘bulk’; bulky disease generally has a poorer prognosis independent of the histologic grade; a major priority in oncology is to debulk a tumour to optimise chemo- or radiation therapy

bulky disease

Oncology A term for a CA with a considerable tumor burden–'bulk'; BD generally has a poorer prognosis independent of the histologic grade; a major priority in oncology is to debulk a tumor to optimize chemo- or RT. See Debulking operation.
References in periodicals archive ?
While experimental, for women with bulky disease (greater than 2 cm), neoadjuvant chemotherapy and subsequent trachelectomy has been reported (Gynecol.
This breath analysis method presents the potential for a cheaper and more reliable diagnostic option for patients found to have bulky disease on a CT scan.
The overall response to ibrutinib was independent of prior treatment including bortezomib and lenalidomide or underlying risk/prognosis, bulky disease, gender or age.
Bulky disease was defined as the presence of a nodal mass greater than 10 cm in diameter.
Patients with bulky disease may require neoadjuvant chemotherapy and/or primary interval cytoreduction.
The other risk factors were a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) score greater than 10 ng/mL, a biopsy Gleason score of 7 or higher, the presence of bulky disease on endorectal MRI, a palpable nodule, and either multiple positive biopsy cores or a high percentage of tumor on biopsy cores.
In 26 patients with 31 EMPs, locoregional tumor control, with radiation alone, was limited by poor performance status, treatment fields (from previous radiation therapy), or concurrent illness in patients with bulky disease.
Thirty percent of LTR patients had bulky disease (tumor size greater than five centimeters) and 83 percent had stage III/IV disease.
The 5-year survival rate of 42% in our patients with occult N2 disease (10) is matched by results reported from Memorial Sloan-Kettering (11) and Tufts, (12) in contradistinction to the vast majority of patients with stage N2 disease (90%) who have bulky disease, in whom the 3-year survival rate may be less than 10%.
0 mm, explaining the poor results with retained bulky disease (9, 10).