bulbil


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bulbil

a small BULB or tuber which arises on the aerial part of a plant in the axil of a leaf, or in an inflorescence.
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Unfortunately, it's extremely invasive and spreads by tiny underground structures known as bulbils.
Bulbils and stem bulblets are easy ways to propagate lilies, but only a few cultivated lilies form them.
Eventually the stalk dies, and the bulbils start a new clump nearby, hence the name.
Aboveground, the flower at the tip of the stalk develops many small bulblets, known as bulbils, which can be planted in the fall and used for garlic greens.
Bulbils are usually brown, yellow or purple rather than white.
The only non-chemical alternative is to winkle out the roots and the nut-like bulbils repeatedly, whenever leaf growth is seen, a process that could take two or three years.
As they are about to go dormant in the next few weeks, they produce hundreds of tiny bulbils, known as cormlets.
In fact, it's an increasingly hectic time, with all cuttings to be taken and the little lily bulbils to be harvested, cleaned and stored in polythene bags until they begin to sprout little bulbs and roots after about three months.
It also produces bulbils at the base of its inflorescences, which can be planted to increase your collection of ``Jungle Jewels.
If one accepts that the garlic cloves and onion scales from the Cave of the Treasure near the Dead Sea are Chalcolithic in date (Bar-Adon 1980: 223; Leach 1982: 9), then earlier horticulture must have existed; neither onion nor garlic have a known wild progenitor in the eastern Mediterranean, and garlic requires vegetative reproduction from cloves or inflorescence bulbils, being unable to set seed (Zohary & Hopf 1994: 185).
Patricia Golding, St Ives, Cambs THESE 2 are bulbils that develop in the leaf axils and when they swell and fall off will go on to produce new plants.