bulb syringe


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

syringe

 [sir´inj, sĭ-rinj´]
an instrument for introducing fluids into or withdrawing them from the body.
Components of a syringe. Shading indicates areas that must be kept sterile before and during parenteral injections. From Bolander, 1994.
Asepto syringe a syringe designed to fit directly into large lumen tubing; also used for intraoperative irrigation.
bulb syringe a syringe with a bulb on one end; compression of the bulb creates a vacuum for gentle suction of small amounts of bodily drainage, such as oral and nasal secretions. It is also used for intraoperative irrigation.
Using a bulb syringe. From Lammon et al., 1995.
hypodermic syringe one for introduction of liquids through a hollow needle into subcutaneous tissues.

bulb syringe

a device with a flexible bulb that replaces the plunger for instillation or aspiration. Bulb syringes can be used to irrigate an external orifice, such as the auditory canal. See also syringe.

syringe

an instrument for introducing fluids into or withdrawing them from the body.

bulb syringe
a compressible rubber bulb with a pierced, pointed end that allows suction and expulsion of fluids. Useful in irrigating ears or small cavities as in abscesses.
syringe driver
an electronically controlled syringe used for delivering small volumes of fluid at a constant rate.
hypodermic syringe
one for introduction of liquids through a hollow needle into subcutaneous tissues.
pole syringe
a syringe on a long pole so that the syringe can be operated from a distance, e.g. through the bars of a cage.
projectile syringe
References in periodicals archive ?
As pediatricians, we have long recommended the use of saline drops such as Baby Ayr followed by a bulb syringe as the best, safest way to help clear nasal passages of the infant.
Compliance: The SinuCleanse System uses no pressure and is gentle and more comfortable to use than a bulb syringe or water pick.
Doctors recommend treating symptoms by using nasal saline drops and bulb syringe suctioning in those infants and toddlers who can not blow their nose.
The kit should contain: - A fresh bottle of hydrogen peroxide 3% (USP) - Can of soft dog or cat food, as appropriate - Turkey baster, bulb syringe or large medicine syringe (for administering medications) - Saline eye solution to flush out eye contaminants - Artificial tear gel to lubricate eyes after flushing - Mild grease-cutting dishwashing liquid (for bathing) - Rubber gloves (for bathing) - Forceps to remove stingers - Muzzle to keep the animal from hurting you while it is excited or in pain - Pet carrier to help carry the animal to your local veterinarian * Call your veterinarian or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center at 1-888-426-4435 if you suspect that your pet has ingested something poisonous.
Because the organisms live within the waterlines, only heat-sterilized/sterile-disposable bulb syringes or sterile water delivery devices should be used to deliver the sterile water.