bug

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bug

(bŭg),
An insect belonging to the suborder Heteroptera. For organisms so called, see the specific term.

bug

(bŭg)
n.
1.
a. An insect having mouthparts used for piercing and sucking, such as an aphid, a bedbug, or a stinkbug.
b. An insect of any kind, such as a cockroach or a ladybug.
c. A small invertebrate with many legs, such as a spider or a centipede.
2.
a. A disease-producing microorganism or agent: a flu bug.
b. The illness or disease so produced: took several days to get over the bug.

bug′ger n.

bug

an error in a computer program (software bug) or a design flaw in computer hardware (hardware bug), usually resulting in an inability to process data correctly.
Computers Any defect in a system, usually understood as a software problem
Drug slang See Coke bug
Entomology Any of a number of insects that suck blood—e.g., bed bugs (Cimex lectularius)—and/or act as vectors for disease—e.g., reduviid bugs, carriers of trypanosomiasis
Informatics A tool used by hackers to access all the cookies from other websites stored on a PC’s hard drive
Microbiology A popular synonym for bacteria

bug

Medical entomology Any of a number of insects that are bloodsucking–eg, bed bugs–Cimex lectularius and/or act as vectors for disease–eg, reduviid bugs, carriers of trypanosomiasis. See Assassin bug, Kissing bug, Red bug, Reduviid bug Microbiology A popular synonym for bacteria. See Superbug.

bug

(bŭg)
1. Any insect of the order Hemiptera.
2. More colloquially, any insect or arachnid.
3. (slang) An acute febrile illness such as influenza or the common cold.
[of uncertain origin]

bug

One of various wingless or four-winged insects of the order Hemiptera and especially of the suborder Heteroptera , with piercing and sucking mouth parts. The bugs of medical importance include the cone nose (Reduviid) ‘assassin’ or ‘kissing’ bugs which transmit CHAGAS' DISEASE, and the bed bug, Cimex lectularis , which cause painful bites.

bug

(bŭg)
1. Any insect of the order Hemiptera.
2. More colloquially, any insect or arachnid.
3. (slang) An acute febrile illness such as influenza or the common cold.
[of uncertain origin]

bug,

n an error in a computer program.

bug

a member of the family Cimicidae in the order Hemiptera and includes the blood-sucking bugs. See haematosiphon and oeciacus vicarius.

Patient discussion about bug

Q. i don't like bugs! actually , i afraid of them . is it a phobia? do i need to see someone to discuss it?

A. Phobia or the excess fear of an ordinary object is indeed considered a disorder. However, as many other psychiatric disorders, as long as it doesn’t affect your life adversely and you are capable of functioning well in your daily life you don't HAVE to treat it (unless you want to).

More discussions about bug
References in periodicals archive ?
When packaging, it has been noted that keeping jasmine and also tea tree oils in the bags can deter bed bugs from hitching a ride in your belongings.
He said farmers faced losses of billions of rupees annually due to an attack of dusky bugs.
Then, in indoor trials, they were guided by their handlers to find bugs hidden in cardboard boxes.
The recent resurgence of bed bugs has public health implications, as well as economic and psychological impacts associated with infestations and bites.
uk is delighted to announce the signing of an exclusive licensing agreement with New York based bed bug specialists Dana K9 Inc.
There are two kinds of insects "invading" Massachusetts, the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug and the Western Conifer Seed Bug.
In my role as an urban pest management consultant, it amazes me that bed bugs take up the majority of my time.
It is paramount that staff is trained to identify bed bugs to supplement the professional exterminator's opinion.
Some people become so traumatized by the fear of having bed bugs crawl all over them and bite them all night that they actually become afraid to go to sleep.
The apartment would have to be vacant for over a year (that's how long bed bugs can live without feeding), not be attached to another occupied unit where bugs could have migrated, and contain no alternate hosts, such as a mouse somewhere in the structure.
If there's a bug or another object nearby, the sound bounces off the object and comes back to the bat.
Schuh and his colleagues are interested in plant-feeding "true bugs.