buffy coat


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coat

 [kōt]
1. a membrane or other structure covering or lining a part or organ; in anatomic nomenclature called tunica.
2. the layer or layers of protective protein surrounding the nucleic acid in a virus. See also capsid.
buffy coat the thin yellowish layer of leukocytes overlying the packed erythrocytes in centrifuged blood.

buff·y coat

the upper, lighter portion of the blood clot (coagulated plasma and white blood cells), occurring when coagulation is delayed so that the red blood cells have had time to settle; the portion of centrifuged, anticoagulated blood that contains leukocytes and platelets.

buffy coat

Etymology: ME, buffet + Fr, cote
a grayish white layer of white blood cells and platelets that accumulates on the surface of sedimented erythrocytes when blood is allowed to stand or is centrifuged.

buffy coat

The flavescent (yellow-white) band of cells and debris present between the upper layer of plasma and the lower layer of RBCs when whole blood is spun at 5000 RPM, which corresponds to WBCs.

buffy coat

Lab medicine The flavescent yellow-white band of cells and debris present between the upper layer of plasma and the lower layer of RBCs, when whole blood is spun at 5000 RPM, which corresponds to WBCs

buf·fy coat

(bŭf'ē kōt)
The light-colored layer of blood that is seen when anticoagulated blood is centrifuged or allowed to stand. It appears as a layer between the plasma and eythrocytes and is composed of leukocytes and platelets.

buffy coat

Enlarge picture
BUFFY COAT
A light stratum of blood seen when the blood is centrifuged or allowed to stand in a test tube. The red blood cells settle to the bottom and, between the plasma and the red blood cells, a light-colored layer contains mostly white blood cells. Platelets are at the top of this coat; the next layers, in order, are lymphocytes and monocytes; granulocytes; and reticulocytes. In normal blood, the buffy coat is barely visible; in leukemia and leukemoid reactions, it is much larger. See: illustration

buffy coat

The creamy layer of white blood cells that forms between the PLASMA and the column of packed red cells when anticoagulated blood is centrifuged. Practical use is made of this layering in the production of buffy coat-poor red cell transfusion fluids in cases in which it is considered that the risk of post-operative infection from the immunosuppressive effect of white cells in transfused blood is excessive.

Buffy coat

The thin layer of concentrated white blood cells that forms when a tube of blood is spun in a centrifuge.
Mentioned in: Leukemia Stains

buffy coat

reddish gray layer consisting of white blood cells and platelets, observed above packed red cells in centrifuged blood.
References in periodicals archive ?
Only 2 buffy coat samples were available given the low number of confirmed samples available worldwide.
Buffy coat smears can be easily used in the diagnosis of malaria.
Providing a complete system for the production of platelet concentrates from pooled buffy coat filtered and sterile connection systems for the Department of Transfusion Medicine Intercompany (DIMT) of the Province of Padova.
CryoPRO Cryopreservation and Storage Bag Sets: A disposable processing set for the cryogenic preparation and storage of the buffy coat.
This is supported by our data showing that the hCG interference was not observed in the sample spiked with heat-treated buffy coat, suggesting a heat labile interference.
In this context, quantitative buffy coat analysis that can effectively detect each pathogen in blood might be of particular interest (4).
Levine tells us about his early interest in developing Quantitative Buffy Coat Analysis technology and finding new uses for it, his professional collaboration with his colleague Dr.
DNA extracted from the buffy coat and the tumor tissues of the HCC patients was genotyped with the Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.
While manual buffy coat methods typically collect 20 percent of available DNA, the new Maxwell Blood automation system collects up to 80 percent.
2) It was his invention and teachings, through multiple editions of his eponymous text Wintrobe's Clinical Hematology, promoting the visual examination of the buffy coat of centrifuged blood, that led Wardlaw and me to invent, thirty-six years ago, the first dry hematology system that delivered multiple hematologic parameters.
For buffy coat isolation and freezing at BioCytics, whole blood was collected in BD Vacutainer cell preparation tubes (BD BioSciences).