Buff

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Medical slang To 'spin' a patient’s history to facilitate a turf transfer to another’s service
Vox populi Describing someone with good muscle definition
References in classic literature ?
of Fizkin Lodge, near Eatanswill, had been prevailed upon by his friends to stand forward on the Buff interest.
Pickwick--'I'll just read you a few of the leaders I wrote at that time upon the Buff job of appointing a new tollman to the turnpike here; I rather think they'll amuse you.
Pickwick's hat was knocked over his eyes, nose, and mouth, by one poke of a Buff flag-staff, very early in the proceedings.
Cobb solemnly, as he remounted his perch; and as the stage rumbled down the village street between the green maples, those who looked from their windows saw a little brown elf in buff calico sitting primly on the back seat holding a great bouquet tightly in one hand and a pink parasol in the other.
She'll soon leave off saying that," replied the one in buff.
Tess, having quickly eaten her own meal, beckoned to her eldest sister to come and take away the baby, fastened her dress, put on the buff gloves again, and stooped anew to draw a bond from the last completed sheaf for the tying of the next.
From Orsha they fled farther along the road to Vilna, still playing at blindman's buff with the pursuing army.
We had been having a splendid game of Blind-Man's Buff.
The replies also were typical, and in the buff of conversation her fears vanished.
There don't seem ter be a minute in the day that Miss Polly ain't jest hangin' 'round waitin' ter do somethin' for that blessed lamb if 'tain't more than ter let in the cat--an' her what wouldn't let Fluff nor Buff up-stairs for love nor money a week ago; an' now she lets 'em tumble all over the bed jest 'cause it pleases Miss Pollyanna!
One gusty, raw day at the end of April--the rain whipping the pavement of that ancient street where the old Slaughters' Coffee- house was once situated--George Osborne came into the coffee-room, looking very haggard and pale; although dressed rather smartly in a blue coat and brass buttons, and a neat buff waistcoat of the fashion of those days.
Being buttoned up in a tightish blue surtout, with a buff waistcoat and gray trousers, he had something of a military air, but he announced himself at the Crozier (the orthodox hotel, where he put up with a portmanteau) as an idle dog who lived upon his means; and he farther announced that he had a mind to take a lodging in the picturesque old city for a month or two, with a view of settling down there altogether.