bud


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bud

 [bud]
1. a structure on a plant, often round, that encloses an undeveloped flower or leaf.
2. something resembling the bud of a plant, especially a protuberance in the embryo from which an organ or part develops.
end bud the remnant of the embryonic primitive knot, from which arises the caudal part of the trunk.
limb bud one of the four lateral swellings appearing in vertebrate embryos, which develop into the two pairs of limbs.
tail bud
the primordium of the caudal appendage.
taste b's end organs of the gustatory nerve containing the receptor surfaces for the sense of taste.
ureteric bud a dorsal outgrowth of the mesonephric duct near its entry into the cloaca; it is the primordium of the ureter, renal pelvis, calices, and collecting tubules of the kidneys.
bud of urethra bulb of urethra.

bud

(bŭd),
1. An outgrowth that resembles the bud of a plant, usually pluripotential, and capable of differentiating and growing into a definitive structure.
See also: gemmation.
2. To give rise to such an outgrowth.
See also: gemmation.
3. A small outgrowth from a parent cell; a form of asexual reproduction.

bud

(bud)
1. a structure on a plant, often round, that encloses an undeveloped flower or leaf.
2. any small part of the embryo or adult metazoon more or less resembling the bud of a plant and presumed to have potential for growth and differentiation.

end bud  caudal eminence.
limb bud  a swelling on the trunk of an embryo that becomes a limb.
periosteal bud  vascular connective tissue from the periosteum growing through apertures in the periosteal bone collar into the cartilage matrix of the primary center of ossification.
tail bud 
1. in animals having a tail, the primordium that forms it.
taste bud  one of the end organs of the gustatory nerve containing the receptor surfaces for the sense of taste.
ureteric bud  an outgrowth of the mesonephric duct giving rise to all but the nephrons of the permanent kidney.

bud

(bŭd)
n.
1. Botany
a. A small protuberance on a stem or branch, sometimes enclosed in protective scales and containing an undeveloped leaf, flower, or leafy shoot.
b. The stage or condition of having buds: branches in full bud.
2. Biology
a. An asexual reproductive structure, as in yeast or a hydra, that consists of an outgrowth capable of developing into a new individual.
b. A small, rounded organic part, such as a taste bud, that resembles a plant bud.
v. budded, budding, buds
v.intr.
1. To put forth or produce buds: a plant that buds in early spring.
2. To reproduce asexually by forming a bud.

bud′der n.

bud

Etymology: ME, budde
any small outgrowth that is the beginning stage of a living structure, as a limb bud from which an upper or lower limb develops.

bud

Botany
A small swelling or projection on a plant, from which a shoot, cluster of leaves or flowers develop; a rudimentary, undeveloped shoot, leaf or flower.

Drug slang
A regional term for marijuana.

Embryology
See Syncytial bud.

bud

(bŭd)
1. An outgrowth that resembles the bud of a plant, usually pluripotential, and capable of differentiating and growing into a definitive structure.
2. To give rise to such an outgrowth.
See also: gemmation
3. A small outgrowth from a parent cell; a form of asexual reproduction.

bud

an undeveloped embryonic shoot in a plant containing a meristematic area (see MERISTEM) for cell division, surrounded by leaf primordia (immature leaves) with often an outer protective layer of scales formed from modified leaves. The tip of a twig usually carries a terminal bud, while leaves generally have a lateral bud in their AXILS.

bud

a structure resembling the bud of a plant, especially a protuberance in the embryo from which an organ or part develops.

end bud
the remnant of the embryonic primitive knot, from which arises the tail and caudal part of the trunk.
horn bud
bilateral cranial protuberances, destined to develop to a fighting horn or antler stage.
limb bud
one of the four lateral swellings appearing in vertebrate embryos, which develop into the two pairs of limbs.
tail bud
1. the primordium of the caudal appendage.
2. end bud.
taste b's
end organs of the gustatory nerve containing the receptor surfaces for the sense of taste.
ureteric bud
an outgrowth of the mesonephric duct giving rise to all but the nephrons of the permanent kidney.
bud of urethra
bulb of urethra.
References in classic literature ?
Night came again, and the fire-flies flew; But the bud let them pass, and drank of the dew; While the soft stars shone, from the still summer heaven, On the happy little flower that had learned the lesson given.
He had faith enough to believe, and wisdom enough to know, that the bloom of the flower would be even holier and happier than its bud.
His Serene and Tremendous Majesty, King Bud of Noland.
sports' are extremely rare under nature, but far from rare under cultivation; and in this case we see that the treatment of the parent has affected a bud or offset, and not the ovules or pollen.
I don't think he wants to drive,' Bud says, considerin'.
All that troubled her was her wish that she knew whether all the roses were dead, or if perhaps some of them had lived and might put out leaves and buds as the weather got warmer.
Soon the trees put forth their buds, and flowers sprang up under his feet, and instead of thick clouds there was blue sky over his head, and everywhere the birds were singing.
Even the grey-ribbed trees looked young, for the pointed buds on them were still pink, and in a pattern against the strong blue looked like innumerable childish figures.
The midnight airs and gusts, moaning amongst the tightly-wrapped buds and bark of the winter twigs, were formulae of bitter reproach.
But though I do not know what causes the cold winds to blow when the oak buds unfold, I cannot agree with the peasants that the unfolding of the oak buds is the cause of the cold wind, for the force of the wind is beyond the influence of the buds.
Girls, sometimes I feel as if those exams meant everything, but when I look at the big buds swelling on those chestnut trees and the misty blue air at the end of the streets they don't seem half so important.
But I must not fly too boldly in the face of Providence, and have ordered those in the boxes to be taken into the greenhouse for the winter, and hope the Bouquet d'Or, in a sunny place near the glass, may be induced to open some of those buds.