nanotechnology

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nanotechnology

[-teknol′əjē]
technology at the level of atoms, molecules, and molecular fragments, including manipulating them and creating new structures.

nanotechnology

(nă″nō-tĕk-nŏl′ŏ-jē) [L. nanus, dwarf, + Gr. technē, art, + logos, word, reason]
The scientific study and engineering of chemical or biological objects measuring between 1 and 1000 nanometers. Objects this small are about the size of atoms or small molecules. “Wet” nanotechnology is the manipulation of organic or biological compounds in solution. “Dry” nanotechnology is the engineering of objects on silicon or carbon surfaces, such as those used in computing.

nanotechnology

The application of the science of manipulation at an atomic level. The practical applications of the ability to move single atoms so as to construct molecules, materials, structures and even functioning machines at an atomic level. Nanotechnology is currently at a germinal stage but is expected to have extensive applications in medicine. See also MAGNETIC NANOPARTICLES.
References in periodicals archive ?
89) All told, Buckyballs sets contained five warnings on the packaging and instructions.
While the plain and hexa buckyballs showed no damage to cells, the tris
In 1991, Japanese scientist Sumio Iijima discovered carbon nanotubes among the buckyballs, opening up a realm of new technological possibilities.
Accordingly, chemists now placed atoms of various elements - potassium, cesium, and even uranium - inside buckyballs, and gleefully spoke of "shrink-wrapping an atom.
If you took a buckyball apart, it wouldn't be a stable entity because it would have dangling bonds," Rabideau points out.
When buckyballs were discovered in 1985, scientists hoped to use them in all sorts of areas, including medicine.
While a given buckyball is very strong, the force that binds it to other buckyballs is very weak.
In graphene, electrons can flow far more freely than they can in either buckyballs or nanotubes, in part because it is the simplest of these forms of carbon.
238) describes placing a beryllium-7 into a 60-carbon molecule known as a buckyball.
This year the evening features the Buckyball Discovery Team Reunion.
A buckyball, or C60, is one shape within the family of tiny carbon shapes known as fullerenes.
He and his colleagues report in the April 18 Science that a buckyball pair with added electrons might even form molecular bonds, similar to those in hydrogen molecules.