nanotechnology

(redirected from buckyball)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Encyclopedia.

nanotechnology

[-teknol′əjē]
technology at the level of atoms, molecules, and molecular fragments, including manipulating them and creating new structures.

nanotechnology

(nă″nō-tĕk-nŏl′ŏ-jē) [L. nanus, dwarf, + Gr. technē, art, + logos, word, reason]
The scientific study and engineering of chemical or biological objects measuring between 1 and 1000 nanometers. Objects this small are about the size of atoms or small molecules. “Wet” nanotechnology is the manipulation of organic or biological compounds in solution. “Dry” nanotechnology is the engineering of objects on silicon or carbon surfaces, such as those used in computing.

nanotechnology

The application of the science of manipulation at an atomic level. The practical applications of the ability to move single atoms so as to construct molecules, materials, structures and even functioning machines at an atomic level. Nanotechnology is currently at a germinal stage but is expected to have extensive applications in medicine. See also MAGNETIC NANOPARTICLES.
References in periodicals archive ?
78) In December, Rolling Stone named Buckyballs "Toy of the Year" in its annual gift guide.
Carbon nanotubes are one of the more technologically promising nanostructures, although soccer ball-shaped buckyballs -- the first nanostructures to be discovered -- also have their place (see story opposite).
What do buckyballs and trapped gas have to do with asteroids and mass extinction?
They produced a brown, spongy material in which hydrophobic (water-avoiding) buckyballs forced the hydrophilic (waterseeking) amines to the outside, where passing carbon dioxide could bind to the exposed nitrogen.
Second, buckyballs gave rise to some extremely unusual electrical behavior.
So, the search turned to finding a way to "build" a buckyball from scratch.
Buckyballs to the rescue: The molecule that won its discoverers this year's Nobel Prize in chemistry may also someday win a bodily battle against bacteria.
These molecules, part of a class called fullerenes, were touted as the next big thing in electronics; yet after a quarter century, nobody has a buckyball running an iPhone.
Since then, chemists have synthesized some 5,000 variants of the buckyball, including elongated spheroids, sheets of carbon and microscopic tubes.
238) describes placing a beryllium-7 into a 60-carbon molecule known as a buckyball.
He and his colleagues report in the April 18 Science that a buckyball pair with added electrons might even form molecular bonds, similar to those in hydrogen molecules.