buckthorn


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Related to buckthorn: Sea Buckthorn

buck·thorn

(bŭk'thōrn),
Shrub or tree of family Rhamnaceae, Karwinskia humboldtiana commonly called Coyotillo or Tullidora. Found in arid southwestern U.S. environments; uncharacterized neurotoxin with high toxicity; single intake of just 0.05-0.3% by body weight in plant material; fruit is particularly toxic. Impaired cerebellar and peripheral nerve function is characteristic; clinical signs include hypersensitivity, tremors, abnormal gait, progressing to paralysis especially in hind quarters; pulmonary edema in some cases also. Toxin produces progressive polyneuropathy through segmental demyelination and degenerative changes in axons of peripheral nerves, followed by myodegeneration.
See also: polyneuropathy.

buckthorn

(bŭk′thôrn′)
n.
1. Any of various shrubs or small trees of the genera Rhamnus and Frangula, including several ornamentals, medicinal species such as the cascara buckthorn, and the invasive species R. cathartica.
2. See bumelia.

alder buckthorn

A deciduous shrub, the bark of which contains anthraquinones; it has laxative activity and has been used internally by herbalists for constipation, and topically for minor cuts.
Toxicity Prolonged use may evoke a “lazy bowel” syndrome; it should not be used in patients with colitis, haemorrhoids, or gastric ulcers, or in pregnancy or during nursing.

buck·thorn

(bŭk'thōrn)
Shrub or tree offamily Rhamnaceae, Karwinskia humbold tiana, commonly called coyotillo or tullidora. Found in arid southwestern U.S. environments; contains a highly potent neurotoxin.
See also: polyneuropathy
Synonym(s): common buckthorn, waythorn.

buckthorn,

n Latin name:
Rhamnus cathartica; parts used: fruit, bark; use: laxative; precautions: pregnancy, lactation, children, elderly; patients with gastrointestinal problems, Crohn's disease, appendicitis, colitis, diabetes; can cause tremors, nausea, diarrhea, stomach cramps, dehydration, and electrolyte imbalance. Also called
common buckthorn, hartsthorn, purging buckthorn, or
waythorn.

buckthorn

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Shade Requirements for the Suppression of Buckthorn Seedling Growth.
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In terms of size, Italian buckthorn (Rhamnus alaternus) has been suggested as an oleander alternative, as it grows into a plant of similar dimensions.
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Here in Wisconsin, October and November are good times to view the takeover of roadsides and native forest understory, because while the leaves of our native trees have either fallen or turned color, buckthorn leaves are still green.