buffer

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buffer

 [buf´er]
a substance that, by its presence in solution, increases the amount of acid or alkali necessary to produce a unit change in pH. The bicarbonate buffer system in the blood maintains a balance between bicarbonate and carbon dioxide ions and deterimnes the pH of the blood.

buff·er

(bŭf'ĕr),
1. A mixture of an acid and its conjugate base (salt), such as H2CO3 or HCO3-; H2PO4-/HPO42-, that, when present in a solution, reduces any changes in pH that would otherwise occur in the solution when acid or alkali is added to it; thus, the pH of the blood and body fluids is kept relatively constant (pH 7.45) although acid metabolites are continually being formed in the tissues and CO2 is lost in the lungs.
See also: conjugate acid-base pair.
2. To add a buffer to a solution and thus give it the property of resisting a change in pH when it receives a limited amount of acid or alkali.

buffer

/buf·fer/ (buf´er)
1. a chemical system that prevents changes in hydrogen ion concentration.
2. a physical or physiological system that tends to maintain constancy.

buffer

Etymology: ME, buffe, to cushion
a substance or group of substances that tends to control the hydrogen ion concentration in a solution by reacting with hydrogen ions of an acid added to the system and releasing hydrogen ions to a base added to the system. Buffers minimize significant changes of pH in a chemical system. Among the functions carried out by buffer systems in the body is maintenance of the acid-base balance of the blood and of the proper pH in kidney tubules. See also blood buffers, pH.

buffer

Chemistry
(1) A chemical system that minimises the effects—in particular the pH—of changes in the concentration of a substance.

(2) A molecule that serves to prevent large changes in pH by either combining with H+ or by releasing H+ into solution. 

(3) A system that minimises the changes in specific chemical species in solution against addition or depletion of the species.

(4) pH buffers: weak acids or weak bases in aqueous solution. The working range is given by pKa +/ 1.

(5) Metal ion buffers: a metal ion chelator (e.g., EDTA), partially saturated by the metal ion acts, as a buffer for the metal ion.

Computers
A storage zone that “resides” temporarily in the RAM (random access memory) and contains either input or output data, remaining there while waiting for an output (or less commonly, an input) device—e.g., a printer—to allow it access to perform a function. Buffer sizes can be increased with “spooling” software or by increased the printer’s RAM.
 
Drug slang
Regional street drug slang for a crack smoker or a woman who exchanges oral sex for crack.
 
Molecular biology
 A solution containing agents which maintain a constant pH during a biochemical reaction.
 
Vox populi
A person who acts as a go-between.

buffer

Chemistry A chemical system that minimizes the effects, in particular the pH, of changes in the concentration of a substance

buff·er

(bŭf'ĕr)
1. A mixture of an acid and its conjugate base (salt), such as H2CO3/HCO3; H2PO4/ HPO42-, which, when present in a solution, resists changes in pH that would otherwise occur in the solution when acid or alkali is added to it.
See also: conjugate acid-base pair
2. To add a buffer to a solution and thus give it the property of resisting a change in pH.

buffer

a chemical substance which has the capacity to bond to H+ ions, removing them from solution when their concentration begins to rise and releasing H+ ions when their concentration begins to fall. In this way buffers stabilize the pH of biological solutions and are thus important in maintaining HOMEOSTASIS. HAEMOGLOBIN is an excellent example of a buffer, maintaining a stable pH in the ERYTHROCYTE.

buffer,

n a substance in a fluid that tends to lessen the change in hydrogen ion concentration that otherwise would be produced by adding acids or alkalis.
References in classic literature ?
Snagsby, Bucket dips down to the bottom of his mind.
Snagsby," resumes Bucket, taking him aside by the arm, tapping him familiarly on the breast, and speaking in a confidential tone.
In the afternoon he threw the rest of it away, there remaining to him only the half-blanket, the tin bucket, and the rifle.
Somehow he had succeeded in retaining the tin bucket.
I meet his servant come to draw water for his master, and our buckets as it were grate together in the same well.
So fierce had this final struggle become that the sailor paused in the act of flinging more water over him and stared curiously, the canvas bucket partly tilted and dripping its contents to the deck.
But, ring after ring was coiled upon the barrel of the windlass safely, and the connecting chains appeared, and finally the bucket with the two men holding on at the sides - a sight to make the head swim, and oppress the heart - and tenderly supporting between them, slung and tied within, the figure of a poor, crushed, human creature.
The guileless peasant set down his buckets and considered.
The guileless peasant instantly resumed his buckets.
I pulled up three or four of the bottom boards, got a couple of buckets from a locker, and by unmistakable sign-language invited them to fall to.
A few cheers heralded the advent of several young fellows, in shirt- sleeves, carrying buckets, bottles, and towels, who crawled through the ropes and crossed to the diagonal corner from her.
When thou sattest in thine isle, a well of wine giving and granting amongst empty buckets, bestowing and distributing amongst the thirsty: