brush border

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border

 [bor´der]
a bounding line, edge, or surface.
brush border a specialization of the free surface of a cell, consisting of minute cylindrical processes (microvilli) that greatly increase the surface area.
Brush border, characterized by closely packed microvilli. From Dorland's, 2000.
vermilion border the exposed red portion of the upper and lower lips.

brush bor·der

the apical epithelial surface bearing closely packed microvilli about 2 mcm long, such as occur on the cells of the proximal tubule of the nephron.
Synonym(s): limbus penicillatus

brush border

microvilli on the free surfaces of certain epithelial cells, particularly the absorptive surfaces of the intestine and the proximal convoluted tubules of the kidney.
A specialized portion of the free or apical aspect of certain epithelial cells—e.g., of the GI tract—consisting of closely packed microvilli that facilitate absorption; brush border cells line the luminal surface of the intestine and proximal convoluted tubules of the kidneys; the BB contains absorptive microvilli and glycocalyx—which is rich in hydrolytic enzymes

brush border

Physiology A specialized portion of the free or apical aspect of certain epithelial cells–eg, of the GI tract, consisting of closely packed microvilli that facilitate absorption; brush border cells line the luminal surface of the intestine and proximal convoluted tubules of the kidneys; the BB contains absorptive microvilli and glycocalyx–which is rich in hydrolytic enzymes

brush bor·der

(brŭsh bōr'dĕr)
An epithelial surface bearing closely packed microvilli about 2 mcm long, such as occurs in the proximal tubule of the nephron.

brush border

see MICROVILLUS.

brush border

a specialization of the free surface of a cell, consisting of minute cylindrical processes (microvilli) that greatly increase the surface area.

brush border enzymes
include maltase, lactase, α-dextrinase and peptidases. Deficiencies of these enzymes may be primary or, more often, secondary to other intestinal disease.