bruise

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contusion

 [kon-too´zhun]
injury to tissues with skin discoloration and without breakage of skin; called also bruise. Blood from the broken vessels accumulates in surrounding tissues, producing pain, swelling, and tenderness, and the discoloration is the result of blood seepage just under the skin. Most heal without special treatment, but cold compresses may reduce bleeding if applied immediately after the injury, and thus may reduce swelling, discoloration, and pain.

If a contusion is unusually severe, the injured part should be rested and slightly elevated; later application of heat may hasten absorption of blood. Serious complications may develop in some cases. Normally blood is drawn off from the bruised area in a few days, but occasionally blood clotted in the area may form a cyst or may calcify and require surgical treatment. Contusions may also be complicated by infection.
cerebral contusion contusion of the brain following a head injury. It may occur with extradural or subdural collections of blood, in which case the patient may be left with neurologic defects or epilepsy. (See also cranial hematoma.)

bruise

(brūz), Avoid applying this word to hemorrhagic lesions (e.g., extravasation of blood due to coagulation disorder or leakage of blood at a venipuncture site) that are not due to blunt injury.
A blunt injury producing a hematoma or diffuse extravasation of blood without rupture of the skin.
[M.E. bruisen, fr. O.Fr., fr. Germanic]

bruise

(brldbomacz) contusion.

bruise

(bro͞oz)
n.
An injury to underlying tissues or bone in which the skin is not broken, often characterized by ruptured blood vessels and discolorations; a contusion.

bruise

bruise

noun A contusion secondary to traumatic injury of the soft tissues which interrupts capillaries and causes leakage of red cells (RBCs). A bruise appears in the skin as a non-blanchable reddish-purple discolouration. As it fades, it transitions from brown to green to yellow as the body metabolises the RBCs and haeme pigment.
 
Management
Local ice packs after injury.
 
verb To inflict an injury on a person physically or mentally.

bruise

A contusion 2º to traumatic injury of the soft tissues which interrupts capillaries and causes leakage of RBCs; in the skin it appears as a reddish-purple discoloration which does not blanch when pressed upon; when it fades it becomes green and brown as the body metabolizes the RBCs in the skin Management Local ice packs after injury

bruise

(brūz)
1. An injury producing a hematoma or diffuse extravasation of blood withoutrupture of the skin.
2. Synonym(s): contuse.
[M.E.bruisen, fr. O.Fr., fr. Germanic]

bruise

The appearance caused by blood released into or under the skin, usually as a result of injury, but sometimes occurring spontaneously in case of bleeding disorders or disease of the blood vessels.

bruise

a discoloration of the skin due to extravasation of blood into the underlying tissues.

bruise

haematoma formation without rupture of overlying skin

bruise,

n a contusion or ecchymosis; injury, usually caused by blunt impact, in which the capillaries are damaged, allowing blood to seep into the surrounding tissue. Normally minor but painful. Can be serious, leading to hematoma, or can be associated with serious injuries, including fractures and internal bleeding. Minor ones are easily recognized by their characteristic blue or purple color in the days following the injury.

bruise

superficial discoloration due to hemorrhage into the tissues from ruptured blood vessels beneath the skin surface, without the skin itself being broken; called also contusion.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the "Author's Notes" at the end of the novel, Nunez lists two murders, one occurring in 1954, the other in the 1960s, and the 1977 Black Power revolution in Trinidad as real events upon which Bruised Hibiscus is loosely based.
He and his colleagues studied 62 rats whose spines were bruised and that could not support weight on their back legs.
Bruised Head would like to see it become, not only an attraction to tourists, but also to residents in the area.
Avoid: Large, water-soaked, bruised areas are signs of injury.
You can protect the bruise by applying self-adhesive "pontoons" on both sides of the bruised area.
For one crop alone--tomatoes--30 to 40 percent are bruised and consequently spoil, says plant physiologist Autar K.
But skin is not always bruised even when injuries escalate to serious head or limb fractures.
Avoid: Fruit with a dead-white or greenishwhite color and hard, smooth feel; large bruised areas; cuts in the rind.
Fullback Brandon Hancock, who missed Thursday's practice with a bruised thigh, will switch to tailback but it's unlikely the Trojans will run too often.
Railton suffered a badly bruised shoulder and will miss today's action while Marston (bruised jaw) and Thornton (bruised back) were stood down for the rest of the evening.
Maggette had missed the past two games with a bruised left foot, practiced Tuesday and was not officially ruled to play until moments before Wednesday's contest.
POLICE arrested Gary Busey after his former-wife complained he left her bruised, authorities said yesterday.