Brucella

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Related to brucellae: Brucella melitensis

Brucella

 [broo-sel´ah]
a genus of gram-negative, aerobic, nonmotile cocci or rod-shaped bacteria, the etiologic agent of brucellosis. B. abor´tus, which causes infectious abortion in cattle, is the most common cause of infection in humans; other species pathogenic for humans are B. meliten´sis, found in goats and sheep, and B. su´is, found in swine.

brucella

 [broo-sel´ah]
any member of the genus Brucella. adj., adj brucel´lar.

Brucella

(brū-sel'lă),
A genus of encapsulated, nonmotile bacteria (family Brucellaceae) containing short, rod-shaped to coccoid, gram-negative cells. These organisms do not produce gas from carbohydrates and are parasitic. They invade all animal tissues and infect the genital organs, the mammary gland, and the respiratory and intestinal tracts; are pathogenic for humans and various species of domestic animals. The type species is Brucella melitensis.

Brucella

/Bru·cel·la/ (broo-sel´ah) a genus of schizomycetes (family Brucellaceae). B. abor´tus causes infectious abortion in cattle and is the most common cause of brucellosis in humans. B. bronchisep´tica is another name for Bordetella bronchiseptica. B. su´is usually infects swine, but can also cause severe disease in humans.

brucella

/bru·cel·la/ (broo-sel´ah) any member of the genus Brucella. .brucel´lar

brucella

(bro͞o-sĕl′ə)
n. pl. bru·cellae (-sĕl′ē) or bru·cellas
Any of various aerobic, short, rod-shaped bacteria of the genus Brucella that are pathogenic to humans and domestic animals.

Brucella

A genus of gram-negative, nonmotile, non-encapsulated coccobacilli of unresolved taxonomy, which grows slowly on blood and chocolate agars. It is a facultative intracellular pathogen and causes brucellosis.

Accepted species
B melitensis, B abortus, B suis, B ovis, B neotomae, B canis, B ceti, B pinnipedialis, B microti, B inopinata.

Bru·cel·la

(brū-sel'lă)
A genus of encapsulated, nonmotile bacteria containing short, rod-shaped to coccoid, gram-negative cells. These organisms are parasitic, invading all animal tissues and causing infection of the genital organs, the mammary gland, and the respiratory and intestinal tracts, and are pathogenic for humans and various species of domestic animals.

Bruce,

Sir David, English surgeon, 1855-1931.
Brucella abortus - infectious bacteria causing abortions in cattle, sheep, mares; causes undulant fever in man and a wasting disease in chickens. Synonym(s): abortus bacillus; Bang bacillus
Brucella - a genus of encapsulated, nonmotile bacteria (family Brucellaceae) causing infection of the genital organs, the mammary gland, and the respiratory and intestinal tracts.
brucellosis - an infectious disease caused by Brucella, and transmitted by direct contact with diseased animals or through ingestion of infected meat, milk, or cheese. Synonym(s): febris undulans; Malta fever; Mediterranean fever; undulant fever

Brucella

a genus of gram-negative rods in seven species and several biotypes. The cause of many serious diseases in animals, including brucellosis.

Brucella abortus
a short rod or coccobacillus which causes brucellosis in cattle and horses, and is a serious zoonosis. Two strains of reduced virulence and used for vaccination in cattle are Strain 19 and Strain 45/20.
Brucella canis
a similar organism to the other brucellae except that it is inhibited in growth by a 10% concentration of CO2, a cultural enhancement for the other species. Causes brucellosis in dogs.
Brucella melitensis
a rod so short that it is easily mistaken for a coccus with the same characteristics as the other brucellae. Causes brucellosis in goats and Malta fever in humans, a serious zoonosis. Rev1 strains are used for vaccination but have zoonotic risk.
Brucella neotomae
found only in the desert wood rat in the USA.
Brucella ovis
has staining and cultural characteristics similar to the other brucellae. Causes brucellosis in rams.
Brucella suis
a typical brucella in morphology and cultural and staining characteristics. Causes brucellosis in pigs and is a significant zoonosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
To further understand the interaction of brucellae among wildlife, domestic animals, and humans, and for purposes of brucellosis management and control, systematic investigations of brucellosis prevalence among wildlife should be conducted.
Soon after entry into the body through the skin or mucous membranes, brucellae are ingested by polymorphonuclear and mononuclear phagocytes.
Because of the variable manifestations of human brucellosis, a wide array of different clinical specimens may contain viable brucellae, including pus, blood, bone marrow, synovial fluid and tissues, and more rarely, cerebrospinal fluid, urine, and genital exudates.
Conventional tests for antibodies to smooth brucellae (agglutination, complement fixation) yielded negative results.
Low antibody titers also could be related to early administration of antimicrobial therapy, as has been shown in patients infected with smooth brucellae (11).
Persons usually become infected with brucellae through direct contact with infected animals or their products.
The epidemiologic pattern of human infection with brucellae has been changing in the United States since 1947, when the number of reported cases was the highest ever recorded (6,321 total; 4.