brownian movement


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movement

 [mo̳v´ment]
1. an act of moving; called also motion.
2. an act of defecation.
active movement movement produced by the person's own muscles.
ameboid movement movement like that of an ameba, accomplished by protrusion of cytoplasm of the cell.
associated movement movement of parts that act together, as the eyes.
brownian movement the peculiar, rapid, oscillatory movement of fine particles suspended in a fluid medium; called also molecular movement.
circus movement the propagation of an impulse again and again through tissue already previously activated by it; the term is usually reserved for the reentry involving an accessory pathway.
molecular movement brownian movement.
passive movement a movement of the body or of the extremities of a patient performed by another person without voluntary motion on the part of the patient.
vermicular m's the wormlike movements of the intestines in peristalsis.

brown·i·an move·ment

erratic, nondirectional, zigzag movement observed by ultramicroscope in certain colloidal solutions and by microscope in suspensions of light particulate matter that results from the jostling or bumping of the larger particles by the molecules in the suspending medium which are regarded as being in continuous motion.
[Robert Brown]

brown·i·an move·ment

(brown'ē-ăn mūv'mĕnt)
Erratic, nondirectional, zigzag movement observed by microscope in suspensions of particles in fluid, resulting from the jostling or bumping of the larger particles by the molecules in the suspending medium.
Synonym(s): molecular movement, pedesis.
[Robert Brown]

Brownian movement

a random movement of microscopic particles suspended in liquids or gases which results from the impact of molecules in the fluid around the particles. Such movements can be seen in COLLOIDS in a solid state or in a suspension of microorganisms. Named after Robert Brown (1773–1858).

Brown,

Robert, English botanist, 1773-1858.
brownian motion - Synonym(s): brownian movement
brownian movement - rapid random motion of small particles in suspension. Synonym(s): brownian motion; brownian-Zsigmondy movement; molecular movement; pedesis
brownian-Zsigmondy movement - Synonym(s): brownian movement

Zsigmondy,

Richard, Austrian-German chemist and Nobel laureate, 1865-1929.
brownian-Zsigmondy movement - Synonym(s): brownian movement
Zsigmondy test - Synonym(s): Lange test

movement

an act of moving; motion.

movement abnormality
includes involuntary movement, lack of flexion or rigidity, hyper- or hypometric.
active movement
movement produced by the animal's own muscles.
ameboid movement
movement like that of an ameba, accomplished by protrusion of cytoplasm of the cell.
associated movement
movement of parts that act together, such as the eyes.
brownian movement
continuous movement of particles suspended within a liquid.
conjugate movement
two parts moving synchronously in the same direction, e.g. the eyes.
disjunctive movement
two parts moving synchronously but in opposite directions.
involuntary movement
a movement which the animal is unable to prevent.
molecular movement
the peculiar, rapid, oscillatory movement of fine particles suspended in a fluid medium.
passive movement
a movement of the body or of the extremities of an animal performed by a person without voluntary motion on the part of the animal.
purposeful movement
see voluntary movement (below).
vermicular m's
the wormlike movements of the intestines in peristalsis.
voluntary movement
performed out of the will of the animal; an intentional purposeful movement.
References in periodicals archive ?
Xenakis is very clear in the preface of the score of N'Shima: "The melodic patterns of N'Shima are drawn from a computer-plotted graph as result of Brownian movement (random walk) theory that I introduced into sound synthesis with the computer in the pressure versus time domain.
As is well known, in physics, Brownian movements are small, chaotic movements of molecules suspended in a liquid or a gas, which result from their collision with the surrounding molecules--whether we can hear Xenakis's Brownian movements as good metaphors for the Brownian movements of physics is another question
It is also the one in which the Brownian movements (in the sense of Xenakis's instrumental music) produce sounds that can be compared--using of course another metaphor--to the sounds produced by such probabilistic methods.
t], like Heston model with correlation coefficient [rho] between two Brownian movements.
09, which indicates that underlying asset price volatility will move around 30% within a long period, and correlation coefficient [rho] of two Brownian movements will be around -0.
In the model, [rho] is the risk source of stock index risk source and stock index volatility square, that is, the correlation coefficient between two Brownian movements d[W.
Therefore, Brownian movements of the antioxidant molecules are much faster than those of the nanocrystal ZnO particles.
Whereas the first two eras are named after historical figures (Party leaders Edward Gierek and Wojciech Jaruzelski) symbolic of Polish politics in the 1970s and eighties, the third, with its allusion to Brownian movements or heroin ("brown sugar"), refers to someone or something representing a totally different order.