justice

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justice

 [jus´tis]
a principle of bioethics that means giving others what is due to them; it is comprised of a group of norms for the fair distribution of benefits, risks, and costs. The terms fairness, desert, and entitlement have been used by philosophers to explicate the idea of justice, while equitability and appropriateness of treatment are used in interpretations. A situation involving justice is present whenever persons are due to receive benefits or burdens because of their particular circumstances. Justice may be distributive, criminal or punitive, or rectificatory.

jus·tice

(jŭs'tis),
The ethical principle that persons who have similar circumstances and conditions should be treated alike; sometimes known as distributive justice.
[L. justitia, fr. jus, right, law]

justice

Etymology: L, justus, sufficient
1 a principle of fair and equal treatment for all, with due reward and honor.
2 (in research) equitable distribution of benefits and burdens of research.
3 treating people in a nonprejudicial manner.

jus·tice

(jŭs'tis)
1. An ethical principle of fairness or equity, according equal rights to all and basing rewards on merit and punishments on guilt.
2. nursing Ethical principle that individual people and groups with similar circumstances and conditions should be treated alike; fairness with equal distribution of goods and services.
See also: Nursing Interventions Classification
[L. justitia, fr. jus, right, law]

justice,

n principle of medical ethics according to which a person treats another person with fairness in both medical and nonmedical settings.

jus·tice

(jŭs'tis)
1. An ethical principle of fairness or equity, according equal rights to all and basing rewards on merit and punishments on guilt.
2. nursing ethical principle that individual people and groups with similar circumstances and conditions should be treated alike.
[L. justitia, fr. jus, right, law]

justice,

n the constant and perpetual disposition to render every person his or her due. Also, the conformity of one's actions and will to the law.
References in periodicals archive ?
But difficulties in apprehending the suspects and persuading witnesses to testify against them in court means they may never be brought to justice.
In the run-up to the June 7 election then Home Secretary Jack Straw said the criminal justice system would be set a target to increase by 100,000 the number of recorded crimes ending in an offender being brought to justice by 2004.
But the papers revealed that the number of offences brought to justice last year, in fact, fell by more than 80,000.
KARACHI -- Awami National Party (ANP) leader Shahi Syed on Thursday urged the government not to hasten the execution of death row inmate Saulat Mirza, stressing that the "masterminds behind such criminals" also need to be brought to justice.
ISLAMABAD -- The High Court has asked the Crime Branch (CB) to conduct re-investigation into Tufail Matoo case in a fair and un-biased manner and ensure the culprits are brought to justice within a reasonable time.
Ban said the "recurrent acts of terrorism and violence" were "totally unacceptable" and called for the "perpetrators of this heinous crime to be brought to justice.
13 ( ANI ): In light of 26/11 Mumbai terror mastermind Hafiz Saeed's terror strike threat on New Delhi, the Ministry of External Affairs (MEA) on Tuesday strongly asserted that India would not rest until he is brought to justice.
Working out of his jurisdiction, he defies local law enforcement officials to get to the truth - with the aid of one of the criminal''s past victims, a headstrong doctor determined to see her former captor brought to justice.
THE thugs who abducted a woman and her teenage son in a so-called tiger raid must be brought to justice.
The perpetrators should be brought to justice immediately," said Metn MP Ibrahim Kanaan
All guilty will be brought to justice in accordance with the law of the Kyrgyz Republic.
Judge Andrew Hamilton told Derby Crown Court: "Without her, this man would have never been brought to justice.