broom

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broom

Herbal medicine
A branched shrub which contains alkaloids (e.g., genisteine, sarothamine and sparteine), amino acids, tannin and volatile oil; it is a cardiac depressant, diuretic and laxative.
 
Toxicity
Broom causes vasoconstriction and should be avoided in pregnancy and in hypertension; it is listed by the FDA as “unsafe”.

broom

(brūm)
Herbal made from Cytisus scoparius; purported value as cathartic, diuretic, and emetic. Known to cause abortion. Poisoning possible with overdose. Not approved for any therapeutic purpose.
Synonym(s): broomtop, hogweed, Irish tops, Scotch broom.

broom,

n Latin name:
Sarothamnus scoparius; parts used: branches, buds; uses: emetic, diuretic, antiarrhythmic; precautions: pregnancy, lactation, children; patients with cardiac dis-ease, hypertension, and arrhythmias; labeled unsafe by the FDA can cause headaches, hallucinations (smoking), arrhythmias, nausea, dizziness, tachycardia, shock, and spontaneous abortion through uterine spasms. Also called
bannal, broom top, genista, ginsterkraut, hogweed, Irish broom top, sarothamni herb, Scotch broom, or
Scotch broom top.
broom, butcher's,
n Latin name:
Ruscus aculeatus; parts used: rhizome (dried), roots (dried); uses: laxative, diuretic, leg edema, varicose veins, hemorrhoids, peripheral vascular disease, arthritis, retinopathy; precautions: pregnancy, lactation, children; patients with hypertension and benign prostate hypertrophy, nausea, anorexia, and gastritis (not often). Also called
box holly, knee holly, pettigree, or
sweet broom.
broom, Dyer's (dīˑ·erz brōōmˑ),
n Latin name:
Genista tinctoria; part used: twigs, leaves, flowering stems, seeds; uses: bowel evacuation, induction of perspiration, diuretic, induction of vomiting, vasoconstrictor, dropsy, rheumatism, gout; precautions: none known. Also called
base-broom, boyaci katirtirnagi, dyer's greenweed, dyer's greenwood, dyer's weed, genista, greenweed,
hitotuba-enisida, retama de tintoreros, verfbrem, waxen wood, wede-wixen, woodwaxen, woud-wix, and
dyer's greenweed.

broom

common names for bushy plants with long stiff stems. Includes Cytisus scoparius (common broom), Spartium junceum (Spanish broom), Senecio spartioides (broom groundsel), Sorghum bicolor (broom millet), Gutierrezia microcephala (broom snakeweed).
References in classic literature ?
Jo nodded and laughed, and flourished her broom as she called out.
With that, Jo shouldered her broom and marched into the house, wondering what they would all say to her.
So I will," said Sancho Panza, and having cut some, he asked his master's blessing, and not without many tears on both sides, took his leave of him, and mounting Rocinante, of whom Don Quixote charged him earnestly to have as much care as of his own person, he set out for the plain, strewing at intervals the branches of broom as his master had recommended him; and so he went his way, though Don Quixote still entreated him to see him do were it only a couple of mad acts.
But he was back in a few moments, having discarded his broom and provided himself, from some mysterious source, with an exquisite bouquet of flowers.
It then, with an old broom it carries, softly sweeps the step and makes the archway clean.
Very well," answered Nick, "the broom shall be used for a tail," and he fastened it firmly to the back end of the sofa body.
then the sofas were sprinkled, and the broom given a slight coating.
There were no seals behind us, and ahead of us the line of fourteen boats, like a huge broom, swept the herd before it.
A stable boy, spruce and smart in his holiday attire, met them with a broom in his hand, and followed them.
My client is Sir Bernard Debenham, of Broom Hall, Esher.
So down I went to Esher to find out if there was a copy in existence, and was at Broom Hall for one hour and a half yesterday afternoon.
I took away the broom as gently and as kindly as I could.