brood

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brood

(brūd),
1. Synonym(s): litter (2)
2. To ponder anxiously; to meditate morbidly.

brood

(bro͞od)
n.
The young of certain animals, especially a group of young birds hatched at one time and cared for together.
v. brooded, brooding, broods
v.intr.
a. To sit on or hatch eggs.
b. To protect developing eggs or young.
v.tr.
a. To sit on or hatch (eggs).
b. To protect (developing eggs or young).
adj.
Kept for breeding: a brood hen.

brood′ing·ly adv.

brood

Veterinary medicine
noun A posse of young birds hatched simultaneously.
 
Vox populi
noun A popular term for one’s offspring.

verb To ruminate upon something to a morbid degree; to ponder, often melancholily.

brood

offspring or pertaining to offspring.

brood mare
a mare dedicated to the production of foals.
References in periodicals archive ?
Besides nest volume, bee spaces and the dimensions of brood cells also vary among races.
The Varroa control was done and experimental colonies were equalized with regard to adult bee, brood and food stocks (Mahmood et al.
Nevertheless, we erred on the side of caution by deleting these two broods from the analysis.
Evidence of second broods (Table 1) is summarized below for two females in 2010 and one pair in 2011.
Caption: Cicadas such as this one in Virginia, from the Brood II group of the Magicicada genus, began to emerge in May after living underground for 17 years.
Overall grouse breeding success (young:adult) was negatively related to the controlled predator abundance index, with clutch losses (represented by proportion of hens with broods) and adult survival showing stronger relationships than chick survival (represented by mean brood size; see Table 2B).
These data also suggest that smaller individuals may be more susceptible to infections by parasites, parasites may retard growth, or parasitized females simply had fewer developing broods than nonparasitized females.
The final brood starved to death after the mother was torn apart.
But after going back to traditional traps and feeding the caught rodents to owls on the farm, this year's broods have thrived.
Scientists believe all-female broods will pass the chromosome on to their sons, which will produce more female-only broods and eventually there will be no males and the species will die out.
He said: "It's increasingly likely we'll see more second broods in the coming years as our climate gets warmer.