brood


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Related to brood: brood over

brood

(brūd),
1. Synonym(s): litter (2)
2. To ponder anxiously; to meditate morbidly.

brood

(bro͞od)
n.
The young of certain animals, especially a group of young birds hatched at one time and cared for together.
v. brooded, brooding, broods
v.intr.
a. To sit on or hatch eggs.
b. To protect developing eggs or young.
v.tr.
a. To sit on or hatch (eggs).
b. To protect (developing eggs or young).
adj.
Kept for breeding: a brood hen.

brood′ing·ly adv.

brood

Veterinary medicine
noun A posse of young birds hatched simultaneously.
 
Vox populi
noun A popular term for one’s offspring.

verb To ruminate upon something to a morbid degree; to ponder, often melancholily.

brood

offspring or pertaining to offspring.

brood mare
a mare dedicated to the production of foals.
References in periodicals archive ?
Brood tubes were collected from mass cultures, as previously described, and assigned haphazardly to the various treatments.
Worker brood cells depth: Brood combs were obtained from 20 different colonies from which the average depth of worker brood cells was determined.
Brood areas and number of frame trait belonging to three genotype groups were analyzed by ANOVA and means were compared using the Duncan multiple comparison test.
One pair only had EPY in the nonsupplemented brood, and the remaining four pairs only had EPY in the supplemented broods.
A) Mean brood production rating of test colonies with brood: 4 = excellent, substantially more brood than workers; 3 = good, brood about equal to workers; 2 = poor, brood substantially less than workers; 1 = bad, only a little brood visible; and 0 = no brood.
In the absence of contrary evidence, it was assumed that one egg was laid per day, that clutch size was seven (mean clutch or brood size at Iqaluit = 7.
Overall grouse breeding success (young:adult) was negatively related to the controlled predator abundance index, with clutch losses (represented by proportion of hens with broods) and adult survival showing stronger relationships than chick survival (represented by mean brood size; see Table 2B).
Cicada researchers are using observations from citizen scientists, along with automated devices equipped with GPS, to make more accurate records of Brood II's emergence than any cicada invasion before.
Most are on a 17-year cycle, though three reproduce every 13 years and the cycles are staggered, meaning that at least one of the broods hatches each year.
Brood XIX, a 13-year brood of periodical cicadas, has the largest distribution of the periodical cicada broods, being reported from Maryland south to Georgia, westward through Arkansas and easternmost Oklahoma, and north into southern Iowa.
The term "hygienic behavior" was originally first mentioned by Rothenbuhler (1964) and means the ability of worker bees to identify the dead brood and remove it off the cell, thus reduce the infestation (Peng et al.