bronchoscope

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bronchoscope

 [brong´ko-skōp]
an endoscope especially designed for passage through the trachea to permit inspection of the interior of the tracheobronchial tree and carrying out of endobronchial diagnostic and therapeutic maneuvers, such as taking specimens for culture and biopsy and removing foreign bodies. adj., adj bronchoscop´ic.
fiberoptic bronchoscope bronchofiberscope.

bron·cho·scope

(brong'kō-skōp),
An endoscope for inspecting the interior of the tracheobronchial tree, either for diagnostic purposes (including biopsy) or for the removal of foreign bodies. There are two types: flexible and rigid.
Synonym(s): bronchofiberscope
[broncho- + G. skopeō, to view]

bronchoscope

/bron·cho·scope/ (brong´kah-skōp) an instrument for inspecting the interior of the tracheobronchial tree and doing diagnostic and therapeutic maneuvers such as removing specimens or foreign bodies.bronchoscop´ic
fiberoptic bronchoscope  bronchofiberscope.

bronchoscope

(brŏng′kə-skōp′)
n.
A slender tubular instrument with a small light on the end for inspection of the interior of the bronchi.

bron′cho·scop′ic (-skŏp′ĭk) adj.
bron·chos′co·pist (brŏn-kŏs′kə-pĭst, brŏng-) n.
bron·chos′co·py (-kə-pē) n.

bronchoscope

[brong′kəskōp′]
a curved, flexible tube for visual examination of the bronchi. It contains fibers that carry light down the tube and project an enlarged image up the tube to the viewer. The bronchoscope is used to examine the bronchi, to secure a specimen for biopsy or culture, or to aspirate secretions or a foreign body from the respiratory tract. See also fiberoptic bronchoscopy. bronchoscopic, adj.
enlarge picture
Fiberoptic bronchoscope

bronchoscope

A thin, flexible, lighted endoscope used to examine the upper airways, vocal cords and tracheobronchial tree to the 4th to 6th division, obtain diagnostic material (i.e., biopsies, brushings, washings), and instil medicine and mechanics for easy guidance through the tree. Bronchoscopes may have a halogen or xenon light source, a 2–2.5 mm channel.

bronchoscope

Pulmonology A thin, flexible, lighted endoscope used to examine the upper airways, vocal cords, and tracheobronchial tree to the 4th to 6th division, obtain diagnostic material, ie biopsies, brushings, washings, and instill medicine, and mechanics for easy guidance through the tree. See Bronchoscopy.

bron·cho·scope

(brong'kō-skōp)
An endoscope for inspecting the interior of the tracheobronchial tree.
[broncho- + G. skopeō, to view]

Bronchoscope

A lighted, flexible tube inserted into the windpipe to view the bronchi or withdraw fluid samples for testing. Bronchoscopy with a protected brush can be used in the diagnosis of lung abscess in severely ill patients.

bron·cho·scope

(brong'kō-skōp)
An endoscope for inspecting the interior of the tracheobronchial tree.
[broncho- + G. skopeō, to view]

bronchoscope,

n a curved flexible tube for visual examination of the bronchi.

bronchoscope

an endoscope especially designed for passage through the trachea to permit inspection of the interior of the tracheobronchial tree and carrying out of endobronchial diagnostic and therapeutic maneuvers, such as taking specimens for culture and biopsy and removing foreign bodies.

fiberoptic bronchoscope
bronchofiberscope.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the hands of an experienced bronchoscopist, the procedure is quite tolerable for most patients.
The seemingly incongruent techniques of the rigid bronchoscopist and direct laryngoscopist are discussed from an historical perspective.
Two bronchoscopists obtained bronchial epithelial cells from normal volunteers through bronchoscopic bronchial brushings following the same operational guidelines (Ghio et al.
An international group of pediatric bronchoscopists discuss technical aspects in preparation for and performance of the procedure, from common to specialized applications like bronchoalveolar lavage, bronchial biopsy, interventional bronchoscopy, and total-lung lavage; potential alternatives such as rigid and virtual bronchoscopy; the bronchoscopic appearance of the normal upper and lower airways and congenital and acquired abnormalities; and application to conditions like asthma, atelectasis and plastic bronchitis, cystic fibrosis and other chronic suppurative lung diseases, endobronchial tuberculosis, chronic cough, lung transplantation, and immunosuppression.
For pulmonologists, thoracic surgeons, and bronchoscopists, Kurimoto (chest surgery, St.