bronchopulmonary sequestration

bron·cho·pul·mo·nar·y se·ques·tra·tion

a congenital anomaly in which a mass of lung tissue becomes isolated, during development, from the rest of the lung; the bronchi in the mass are usually dilated or cystic and are not connected with the bronchial tree; it is supplied by a branch of the aorta.

bronchopulmonary sequestration

A rare congenital condition related to developmental defects of the embryonic foregut, in which nonfunctioning lung tissue is detached from the normal lung and does not communicate with the bronchopulmonary tree. Sequestered lung tissue is supplied by an anomalous systemic artery—usually arising from the aorta or a tributary—and contains normal elements in a disorderly array with variable amounts of cartilage, alveolar parenchyma and bronchial glands, the secretion from which leads to the formation of fluid-filled cysts. Communication with functional pulmonary tissue explains the common bacterial infections (although there is considerable overlap in the types).

Bronchopulmonary sequestration
Intralobar—85% of cases, bilateral, often supplied by a branch of the thoracic aorta.
Extralobar—More common in men, linked to other congenital defects, may communicate with the foregut; 90% are left sided.

bron·cho·pul·mo·nar·y se·ques·tra·tion

(brong'kō-pul'mŏ-nār-ē sē'kwes-trā'shŭn)
A congenital anomaly in which a mass of lung tissue becomes isolated during development from the rest of the lung; the bronchi in the mass are usually dilated or cystic and are not connected with the bronchial tree; it is supplied by a branch of the aorta.
References in periodicals archive ?
The two types of bronchopulmonary sequestration are intralobar (ILS), as in our patients, and extralobar sequestration (ELS).
Multislice CT and CT angiography for non-invasive evaluation of bronchopulmonary sequestration.
Noninvasive imaging of bronchopulmonary sequestration.
For the purpose of this review, we will focus on the most commonly encountered lesions in our practice, which include cystic adenomatoid malformation, bronchopulmonary sequestration (BPS), and bronchial atresia (BA).
Bronchopulmonary sequestration (BPS) involves abnormal, nonfunctioning pulmonary tissue that does not connect with the normal tracheobronchial tree and receives its vascular supply from the systemic circulation.
In the fetus, polidocanol has been used for fetal intralobar bronchopulmonary sequestration and for congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung.
Results: The CT scan of patient 1 was suspicious for malignancy; however, the pathology of the lung mass revealed only inflammation consistent with an intralobular bronchopulmonary sequestration.
Frozen section did not reveal malignancy, and the final pathology revealed fibrosis, dilated glandular spaces and inflammation consistent with intralobar bronchopulmonary sequestration (Fig.
Pathologic Diagnosis: Intralobar Bronchopulmonary Sequestration
A bronchopulmonary sequestration represents an abnormal, nonfunctioning mass of lung tissue that lacks a connection to the tracheobronchial tree and that is supplied by a systemic artery.
There is only one previous report of Nocardia species infection with intralobar bronchopulmonary sequestration.
Nocardia infection in a bronchopulmonary sequestration.