bronchial tree


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tree

 [tre]
an anatomic structure with branches resembling a tree.
bronchial tree the bronchi and their branching structures; see color plates.
tracheobronchial tree the trachea, bronchi, and their branching structures; see color plates.

bronchial tree

an anatomical complex of the trachea and bronchi. The bronchi branch from the trachea. The right bronchus is wider and shorter than the left bronchus and branches into three secondary bronchi, one passing to each of the three lobes of the right lung. The left bronchus is smaller in diameter and about twice as long as the right bronchus. It is also more horizontal and more susceptible to obstruction. It branches into the secondary bronchi for the inferior and the superior lobes of the left lung. The bronchus is sometimes described as a bronchial tube.

bronchial tree

The bronchi and their branching bronchioles. The trachea divides into two mainstem (primary) bronchi at the level of the sternal angle at the point of the carina, an acutely angled anatomical landmark; the right mainstem bronchus divides into two lobar (secondary) bronchi, and the left mainstem bronchus divides into three lobar bronchi; these in turn divide into segmental (tertiary) bronchi, quaternary, quinary, etc.
Figure 1: Ascending nerve pathways and proprioceptive reflex arcs, represented in diagrammatic sections of the brain and spinal cord. Shown on the right: those serving the sensations listed. Shown on the left: reflex pathways for skeletal muscle control. (A) From a muscle spindle, to a synapse with an alpha motor neuron, and a branch to the brain. (B) From a tendon organ, inhibitory branch (broken line) to an alpha motor neuron, and a branch to the brain.

bronchial tree

the air passages leading from the trachea to the lung alveoli, via a left and a right main bronchus, the branches from these to the lobes of the lungs, and within the lungs the progressively smaller bronchioles, terminal bronchioles (∼0.2 mm diameter) and finally the respiratory bronchioles which open into the alveolar ducts and the alveoli. All branches except the final, smallest ones have circular smooth muscle in their walls, which can change the diameter, varying the resistance to airflow. Cartilage stiffens the walls down to the bronchioles, forming complete rings in the trachea, becoming less complete in the bronchi and their branches. See also airway(s), Figure 1.

bronchial tree

respiratory tract (trachea, bronchi, bronchioles and alveoli)

bronchial

pertaining to or affecting one or more bronchi.

bronchial calculus
a hard concretion formed in a bronchus by accretion about an inorganic nucleus or from calcified portions of lung tissue or adjacent lymph nodes.
bronchial edema
mucosal edema occurs in response to irritation and inflammation of tracheobronchial epithelium. Contributes to increased airway resistance.
feline bronchial asthma
a syndrome in cats characterized by acute episodes of coughing and dyspnea with wheezing. Usually recurrent and believed to be due to allergic reaction. Similar to allergic asthma in humans.
bronchial hypoplasia
swollen spongy tissue or cystic, lobulated tissue replaces lobes of normal lung tissue because of the impediment to air flow caused by dilated or collapsed hypoplastic bronchi; probably the basic defect in adenomatoid hamartoma or congenital adenomatoid malformation.
bronchial pattern
bronchi become more prominent in x-rays because they become more dense than surrounding air-filled lung tissue. Caused by peribronchial infiltration, fluid within the bronchus and calcification of the bronchial cartilage. Seen in chronic bronchitis and bronchiectasis.
bronchial spasm
bronchospasm.
bronchial tones
are the sounds made by the respired air as it passes through the larger air passages of normal lungs. They are best heard over the bifurcation of the trachea. They are harsher and louder than the vesicular murmur, the normal sounds produced in the parenchyma of the lung.
bronchial tree
the bronchi and their branching subdivisions.
bronchial tumors
see pulmonary neoplasm.

tree

1. an anatomical structure with branches resembling a tree.
2. in information science, a decision tree.

bronchial tree
the trachea, bronchi and successive branching generations of the respiratory passages.
tree daffodil
thevetiaperuviana.
decision tree
see decision tree.
tree diagram
see decision tree.
tree lupin
lupinusarboreus.
tree nettle
see urtica.
tree shrew
primitive arboreal mammal that some taxonomists place with the primates. Like squirrels in shape and size. Called also Tupaia spp.
tree snake
a number of colubrid snakes that lead an arboreal existence and practice falling from trees with their body spread out, earning the name of flying snake.
tree tobacco
nicotianaglauca.
tracheobronchial tree
the trachea, bronchi and their branching structures.
tree zamia
cycasarmstrongii, C. media.
References in periodicals archive ?
During inhalation, fresh oxygen-filled air passes through the lungs through the bronchial tree until it comes into contact with the capillary network over the surface of the alveoli.
From that experience, the investigators described excessive toxicity for tumors located within 2 centimeters of the proximal bronchial tree and warned of potential toxicity," Bradley said.
For a cough to be effective in removing excess secretions, the sputum must be thin enough for the cough to move it easily through the bronchial tree.
The laminar or higher flows usually extend down to approximately the beginning of the 18th division of the bronchial tree.
The new system uses a steerable catheter that can also access and biopsy lymph nodes that are near the bronchial tree or trachea.
It can visualize vascular leaks and the presence of contrast media in the bronchial tree.
Lot No 19 - Closed system to collect secretions from the bronchial tree
The most direct and functional definition of a bronchopleural fistula, (BPF), is to describe it as a communication involving both the pleural space and the bronchial tree.
The IBV, a minimally invasive device placed via a standard bronchoscopic procedure in the bronchial tree to achieve volume reduction in parts of the lungs, will follow, providing additional treatment options for patients with emphysema.
Based on this report we envisage treating early lung cancers which cannot be injected and have to be treated by instillation into the bronchial tree," he added.
The intra-bronchial valve is a minimally invasive device placed in the bronchial tree via a standard bronchoscopic procedure.
The intra-bronchial valve, a proprietary minimally invasive device placed in the bronchial tree to achieve lung volume reduction, will provide an important treatment option for patients with emphysema.