bromide

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bromide

 [bro´mīd]
any binary compound of bromine. Bromides produce depression of the central nervous system, and were once widely used for their sedative effect; because overdosage causes serious mental disturbances they are now seldom used, except occasionally in grand mal seizures. See also bromism.

bro·mide

(brō'mīd),
The anion Br-; salt of hydrogen bromide (HBr); several salts formerly used as sedatives, hypnotics, and anticonvulsants.

bromide

/bro·mide/ (bro´mīd) any binary compound of bromine in which the bromine carries a negative charge (Br−); specifically a salt (or organic ester) of hydrobromic acid (H+Br−).

bromide

[brō′mīd]
Etymology: Gk, bromos, stench
an anion of bromine. Bromide salts, once widely prescribed as sedatives, are now seldom used for that purpose because they may cause serious mental disturbances as side effects.

bromide

An chemical compound containing a bromine ion Br-; once used as a hypnotic and sedative and for headaches—e.g., Bromo-Seltzer. It was withdrawn from human use in 1975 due to chronic toxicity. It is of current interest as an industrial toxin—e.g., methyl bromide, which is used as a solvent, degreaser and fumigant.

bro·mide

(brō'mīd)
The anion Br-; salt of hydrogen bromide (HBr); several salts formerly used as sedatives, hypnotics, and anticonvulsants.

bromide (brō´mīd),

n a broad-acting chemical agent used to disinfect surfaces in the dental environment; comes in tablet form and is for use on hard surfaces only.

bromide

any binary compound of bromine. Bromides produce depression of the central nervous system, and were once widely used for their sedative effect. Potassium bromide is used in the treatment of intractable epilepsy. See also brominism.
References in periodicals archive ?
Adams has a taste for the bromidic, for example, in his blithe acceptance of the old claim that "90 percent of all scientists who have ever lived are still living today.
Martin's, could be called "The Despair of Gay Sex"; at least it is more in tune with my melancholy if lyrical vision than is the bromidic, comforting tone of Joy.
But for the intellectual troglodyte with old-fashioned aesthetic taste, Broyles's brand of advocacy history is hard to swallow, for it is written as a tract or manifesto abounding in peremptory and bromidic statements.