bromide

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bromide

 [bro´mīd]
any binary compound of bromine. Bromides produce depression of the central nervous system, and were once widely used for their sedative effect; because overdosage causes serious mental disturbances they are now seldom used, except occasionally in grand mal seizures. See also bromism.

bro·mide

(brō'mīd),
The anion Br-; salt of hydrogen bromide (HBr); several salts formerly used as sedatives, hypnotics, and anticonvulsants.

bromide

/bro·mide/ (bro´mīd) any binary compound of bromine in which the bromine carries a negative charge (Br−); specifically a salt (or organic ester) of hydrobromic acid (H+Br−).

bromide

[brō′mīd]
Etymology: Gk, bromos, stench
an anion of bromine. Bromide salts, once widely prescribed as sedatives, are now seldom used for that purpose because they may cause serious mental disturbances as side effects.

bromide

An chemical compound containing a bromine ion Br-; once used as a hypnotic and sedative and for headaches—e.g., Bromo-Seltzer. It was withdrawn from human use in 1975 due to chronic toxicity. It is of current interest as an industrial toxin—e.g., methyl bromide, which is used as a solvent, degreaser and fumigant.

bro·mide

(brō'mīd)
The anion Br-; salt of hydrogen bromide (HBr); several salts formerly used as sedatives, hypnotics, and anticonvulsants.

bromide (brō´mīd),

n a broad-acting chemical agent used to disinfect surfaces in the dental environment; comes in tablet form and is for use on hard surfaces only.

bromide

any binary compound of bromine. Bromides produce depression of the central nervous system, and were once widely used for their sedative effect. Potassium bromide is used in the treatment of intractable epilepsy. See also brominism.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some of Ravitch's critics have pointed out that her detailed, forceful attacks on choice and accountability are accompanied by an account of the right path for the schools to follow that is meager, vague, bromidic, and nostalgic.
Ironically, in spite of its imposing length, The Kentucky Cycle (at the Royale Theatre) proves too brief to develop any of its seventy-odd characters or to sustain any of its themes in anything other than bromidic ways.
Aside from several verbatim repetitions, it is couched in the bromidic, banal language of education reform (surely not normal to the author, a writer of learning and intellect), perhaps in the hope of making nonacademic converts by incantation.
Mason's message may be so unpalatable because it eschews the usual bromidic alibis of a variety of under-dogs-the indigent, drug abusers, the insane, and rapists, even when minors-and suggests they may ultimately be responsible for their own misery.
Mason's message may be so unpalatable because it eschews the usual bromidic alibis of a variety of under dogs the indigent, drug abusers, the insane, and rapists, even when minors-and suggests they may ultimately be responsible for their own misery.
Mason's message may be so unpalatable because it eschews the usual bromidic alibis of a variety of underdogs the indigent, drug abusers, the insane, and rapists, even when minors-and suggests they may ultimately be responsible for their own misery.