bromide


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to bromide: ipratropium bromide, bromide poisoning

bromide

 [bro´mīd]
any binary compound of bromine. Bromides produce depression of the central nervous system, and were once widely used for their sedative effect; because overdosage causes serious mental disturbances they are now seldom used, except occasionally in grand mal seizures. See also bromism.

bro·mide

(brō'mīd),
The anion Br-; salt of hydrogen bromide (HBr); several salts formerly used as sedatives, hypnotics, and anticonvulsants.

bromide

/bro·mide/ (bro´mīd) any binary compound of bromine in which the bromine carries a negative charge (Br−); specifically a salt (or organic ester) of hydrobromic acid (H+Br−).

bromide

[brō′mīd]
Etymology: Gk, bromos, stench
an anion of bromine. Bromide salts, once widely prescribed as sedatives, are now seldom used for that purpose because they may cause serious mental disturbances as side effects.

bromide

An chemical compound containing a bromine ion Br-; once used as a hypnotic and sedative and for headaches—e.g., Bromo-Seltzer. It was withdrawn from human use in 1975 due to chronic toxicity. It is of current interest as an industrial toxin—e.g., methyl bromide, which is used as a solvent, degreaser and fumigant.

bro·mide

(brō'mīd)
The anion Br-; salt of hydrogen bromide (HBr); several salts formerly used as sedatives, hypnotics, and anticonvulsants.

bromide (brō´mīd),

n a broad-acting chemical agent used to disinfect surfaces in the dental environment; comes in tablet form and is for use on hard surfaces only.

bromide

any binary compound of bromine. Bromides produce depression of the central nervous system, and were once widely used for their sedative effect. Potassium bromide is used in the treatment of intractable epilepsy. See also brominism.
References in periodicals archive ?
But even if all manmade methyl bromide were eliminated, more than 80 percent of the current volume would still be released into the atmosphere.
Methyl bromide is one of the major chemicals still allowed that degrade the ozone layer," says Ray Chavira, a scientist in the EPA's San Francisco pesticide office.
The importance of the invention has been underlined by the existing ban in principle on methyl bromide under the international Montreal Protocol on restricting gases that damage ozone.
First, production and consumption of methyl bromide in the US represents much of the global problem.
So sodium bromide would be Emerson's other ingredient.
As HYDRUS-2D is a 2-dimensional model, it was used to simulate movement of bromide and hexazinone downwards through the soil profile, into and through the groundwater system.
They also found that a 13 percent decline in methyl bromide concentrations in the lower atmosphere since 1998 was responsible for much of the bromine drop.
Table 3 presents estimated associations between methyl bromide use within 5 km of the home as a continuous variable ([log.
With the funding, the government is now prepared to begin providing incentives--consisting of equipment, materials, and technical assistance--to the country's major methyl bromide users, mainly the larger melon producers who can afford to import it, according to IRET's Ramirez.
There are alternatives to methyl bromide that are less harmful to the ozone, but they are also less effective.
As the data shows (Figure 1), samples with the lowest levels of bromide passed Hook testing.