broken windows theory


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broken windows theory

A theory in criminology supported by various experiments regarding the norm-setting and signalling effects of urban chaos (e.g., broken windows, disrepair of buildings, poorly groomed parks, etc.) and vandalism on further crime and anti-social behaviour.

While interpretations of the data differ according to the author, the experiments suggest that correction of small problems—which, if left in disrepair, signal an indifference to the community by the powers of authority—prevents that negative message from extending to an entire building, institution or section of a community.
References in periodicals archive ?
The book outlines seven social constructions of community that have shaped the development of criminological theory related to communities and crime: social disorganization theory, the systems model, the disadvantage model of William Julius Wilson, criminal culture, the broken windows theory of James Q.
On average, trauma-care doctors or their staff members were disrupted once every two minutes, Cohen reports in her article, Using Broken Windows Theory as the Backdrop for a Proactive Approach to Threat Identification in Health Care.
The Broken Windows Theory has been effectively employed in some developed societies by technocrats.
WORCESTER -- There's the broken windows theory, and then there's 142 Eastern Ave.
Lovingly decorated in striped wallpaper, with shelves and a rail for clothes, it pays homage to the broken windows theory (i.
I argue here that order-maintenance policing and the Broken Windows theory it was based on should be viewed as an innovative, neoliberal approach to policing.
The "quality of life" approach and "zero tolerance" style policing employed by Giuliani and Bratton derive from the Broken Windows Theory.
Chief Insp Offside said: "The broken windows theory is simply this, if you have a broken window it gives you a visual idea that crime is more likely to occur in this area.
In essence, the broken windows theory tells us that crime and disorder problems tend to escalate sharply in areas where people disregard small crimes.
Bratton has used the broken windows theory to significantly reduce more serious crimes in cities by enforcing laws for petty crimes and public nuisances, such as urinating in public or throwing bottles in the street.
1) In this paper I argue that this backlash focuses too narrowly on the broken windows theory in its assessments of order maintenance policing, and I develop and apply alternative methods of analysis that focus more directly on the intrinsic merits of efforts to reduce disorder by using ethnographic research and normative analysis.
There is an urgent need to reconcile two very useful public safety and social justice paradigms--the broken windows theory and the what works principle.