broadside

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broadside

A separately published piece of paper, usually printed on one side and intended to be read unfolded, which is posted, publicly distributed or sold—e.g., proclamations, handbills, newsheets.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dangerous Women, and Music in Seventeenth-Century English Broadside Ballads Sarah F.
Northern Broadsides make judicious use of back projection to accomplish this difficult feat.
Many of the now 133 broadsides are breathtakingly beautiful and have incorporated lines from the poet al-Mutanabbi's verse or poems by contemporary Iraqi and American poets.
A great supporter of the work of Northern Broadsides, Blake Morrison is a poet, novelist and journalist, best known for two family memoirs and a study of the James Bulger case.
Broadsides presented their first co-production with the New Vic, The Tempest, in 2007 and Romeo and Juliet in 2008.
Helen Vendler, writing in the New York Times Book Review in September of 1974, adds to Randall's comment, "The instant appeal of broadsides is an old story and suggests that the world would prefer reading poems the way poets write them--one by one" (Vendler 313).
103) in Paris in the mid-19th century that greatly expanded the electorate increasing the use of broadsides among new, often illiterate, voters.
Broadsides were received into these contexts not simply because they were new or different.
It is likely this broadside was copied from one of the Dunlap broadsides.
As adaptor and director of the trilogy, as well as artistic director of Northern Broadsides, Rutter is at the heart of the project.
Northern Broadsides appears at the Theatre Royal in Newcastle from Tuesday, June 13, to Saturday, June 17.
Slaughter collected an amazing array of items during his lifetime, including broadsides, photographs, scrapbooks, speeches and a significant amount of legal documents pertaining to slavery, abolition, the Civil War, and racial issues in the United States, Africa and the British colonies.