broadside


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broadside

A separately published piece of paper, usually printed on one side and intended to be read unfolded, which is posted, publicly distributed or sold—e.g., proclamations, handbills, newsheets.
References in periodicals archive ?
She notes that the broadsides examined here "feature stories of witchcraft, husband-murder, and scolding--transgressions that intertwine the fears of female power, musical and acoustic disorder, loquacity, and social imbalance" (4).
49, 78-9) the association is pretty explicit, but it is still a leap of faith to say that it operated in this way throughout the broadside repertoire.
In a perfect world, then, I'd always take my bow shots at deer when they're standing broadside.
Such achievements prompted one commentator to rank Broadside's contributions more highly than anything on either coast: "No other American city can match the record created in Detroit by Dudley Randall and the Broadside Press.
Most of the collective members called themselves radical feminists (though, over the years, identities shifted and grew) and the content of Broadside reflected that.
Dudley Randall, Broadside Press, and the Black Arts Movement in Detroit, 1960-1995.
The present essay surveys a genre of folksong that has spanned the folk-popular continuum perhaps longer than any other in Anglo-American tradition: the broadside ballad.
The broadside was meant to be tacked up for public display to announce rebellious colonists' intentions to break away from England.
Editors' Note: BIBR regrets the oversight, but please note that we have written about Broadside Press in the past.
A rare printed copy of the news-sheet, known as a broadside and published in Dundee around 1880, is now kept at the National Library of Scotland.
Wrestling with the Muse: Dudley Randall and the Broadside Press.
Watch the angle of the animal closely--seldom is an animal directly facing you or standing exactly broadside.