brief

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brief

(bref) [Fr. bref fr L. brevis, short, brief, a catalogue]
1. A condensed legal argument in legal format and style.
2. A written or spoken summary of an important or complex topic; an abstract.
3. To make a written or spoken summary of.
4. To conduct a short session of instruction or preparation for a person, crew, or staff on how to accomplish an upcoming operation.
See: debrief
References in periodicals archive ?
But when I call an organization whose staff has superior weather training and knowledge, there is nothing more irritating than getting a briefer who simply reads the Notams and TAFs to me.
The briefers tried to prove the White House's case that Iran is shipping deadly weapons, including armor-piercing explosives, to Shiite militias in Iraq.
Organise training for all briefers, if not in team briefing specifically then at least in communications skills.
The briefers are unable to confirm what was reported six hours ago, because military communications are different from media communications.
Conference briefers told attendees to stress to legislators that beer advertising and marketing are already heavily regulated, and that new burdens on beer advertising would thus be unwarranted.
During the war, Pentagon briefers treated the public to videotapes showing a smart bomb diving down the air shaft of a Baghdad building and told anecdotes about the extraordinary accuracy of Tomahawk missiles launched from afar.
Reducing White House briefers to bloody pulps is the press corps' specialty.
These restrictions were accompanied by a carefully prepared public information strategy that included military briefers handpicked for their abilities before TV cameras; elaborate rehearsal of briefers; forbidding Pentagon spokesmen from appearing on programs with any of the 16 plaintiffs in a lawsuit challenging the pool system; and polite forgetfulness of journalists' requests for video footage and other information.
A number of the participants and the briefers have extensive experience with Fluosol DA and other perfluorocarbon synthetic red blood cell products and concepts.
So let me pull together the three overarching themes that have come out from the questions and ask our briefers to respond to those.
While Dave Higdon's comment in his article "Blue-Sky Briefings" (March 2012) on "how and why any pilot would fly without a weather briefing defies logic" is self-evident, I would take issue with what I find to be a very counter-productive attitude on the part of numerous briefers over the years.