bremsstrahlung


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brems·strah·lung

(bremz'strah-lŭng),
Continuous spectrum radiation produced by the slowing of electrons in a beam by nuclei in their vicinity.
[Ger. Bremsstrahlung, braking radiation]

bremsstrahlung

German: braking radiation. A broad spectrum—rather than an energy peak of electromagnetic radiation resulting from the rapid deceleration of a charged particle—photon or electron when it hits the electron cloud of an atom’s nucleus.

bremsstrahlung

braking radiation produced by the electrons being decelerated in the target of the x-ray tube. These rays of mixed wavelengths form the heterogeneous part of the x-ray beam.
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: Figure 2: Postinjection Bremsstrahlung imaging by brain Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT).
In order to find precise values, more complicated calculations of bremsstrahlung [5] are required for the star involving many Feynman diagrams for the mesons, interacting between themselves and with the electrons.
Similarly, should anyone start explaining to me the ins and outs of how to cook a caramelised parsnip roux in a bainmarie, I'll fall asleep faster than you can say "Open University Lecture on Nuclear Fusion: Week Two - Bremsstrahlung losses in quasineutral, isotropic plasmas".
The standard model particles produced by the WIMP annihilation typically have weak scale energies and so by a process of pion decay, bremsstrahlung, or inverse Compton scattering, can lead to gamma-ray emission.
bremsstrahlung and fluorescence photons) is not to be included in dg.
These latter X-rays, unlike those first described, have just a few frequencies but have higher energy than Bremsstrahlung and come out as a single wavelength (Garip, 1998).
There are only a few conceivable sources of graviton production, like black hole decay, spontaneous emission of gravitons from neutral hydrogen, bremsstrahlung from electron-electron collisions in stellar interiors, and conservations of photons to gravitons by interstellar magnetic fields.
With respect to the emission mechanism, the radiation is distinguished between two types: (a) Bremsstrahlung, coming from the component of the acceleration colinear with the particle velocity, and therefore relevant to the ballistic part of the motion, (b) Cyclotron, coming from the acceleration component perpendicular to the velocity, and therefore connected to the rotating part of the motion.
Gamma rays are produced by a number of astronomical processes in which very high-energy electrons are produced, that in turn cause secondary gamma rays by the mechanisms of bremsstrahlung, inverse Compton scattering and synchrotron radiation.
The S-component is generated above active areas in the Sun's chromosphere (most notably plages and sunspots) by bremsstrahlung emission, and by gyromagnetic radiation--a process in which energized electrons release photons as they spiral around strong magnetic fields.
The field jump-starts free electrons in the neighborhood, accelerating them enough to emit X-ray photons known as bremsstrahlung radiation.