breastfeed


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breastfeed

or

breast-feed

(brĕst′fēd′)
v. breast·fed (-fĕd′), breast·feeding, breast·feeds
v.tr.
To feed (a baby) mother's milk from the breast; suckle.
v.intr.
To breastfeed a baby.
References in periodicals archive ?
To ascertain the numbers of mothers who currently breastfeed, breastfeed at or supply expressed breast milk (EBM) to the centres
National Breastfeeding Week is the one week of the year, where we can really support breastfeeding and the Big Breastfeed demonstrates how discreet and natural it can be.
In Kirklees, more than 70% of new mums breastfeed their babies at birth.
They should promote breastfeeding to their pregnant patients and make sure that mothers receive the best advice on how to breastfeed.
Many moms may have been taught to breastfeed incorrectly: Surprising new research.
Women are being encouraged to breastfeed their babies with colostrum within minutes of giving birth, which is why we always ensure skin-to-skin contact between mothers and their newborns immediately after birth," she said.
4 times more likely to breastfeed all their children as compared to mothers who did not breastfeed their first child.
She also said it was unfortunate that Caesarean babies are bottle-fed even though mothers can breastfeed.
Mothers who choose to breastfeed reduce their risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer and reduce the risk of post-partum depression and post-partum weight gain (Wilson, 2010).
The World Health Organization recommends breastfeeding exclusively for the first six months of a baby's life to optimize benefits, continuing to breastfeed for 2 years and as long thereafter as is mutually desired by a woman and her child.
e last Infant Feeding Survey, in 2010, showed that while 81% of UK women started to breastfeed, by the time their babies were one week old, less than half (46%) were exclusively breastfeeding, and by six weeks old less than a quarter (23%) were exclusively breastfeeding.