breast-feed


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breast-feed

(brest-fēd),
To nourish an infant by the act of suckling; to obtain breast milk by sucking at the mother's breast.
References in periodicals archive ?
The youngster was taken to hospital because she was not thriving, but that did not faze Isobel, who was determined to breast-feed her next child.
Businesses should allow mothers to breast-feed but it should be done in private.
I wanted to breast-feed because of all the health benefits but I didn't know if I was doing it right and I was worried about my baby getting enough food.
More than 20 states have laws protecting a woman's right to breast-feed in public.
The NCT is launching a new advertising campaign to encourage the public to be supportive of mothers who breast-feed.
Those who intended to breast-feed for at least four months continued for 4.
The report, Children's Nutri-tion - Mothers Who Wish to Breast-Feed, calls for more support for mothers at home, in the workplace and facilities in public places.
Table 1 shows the proportion of women who chose to breast-feed by PBB exposure stratified by 5-year birth cohorts.
Physicians should share this information with expectant mothers, especially those who are undecided about whether to breast-feed, he said in an interview.
We hope the Trust's new policy will encourage more and more women to successfully breast-feed their babies for as long as they wish.
Mothers on low incomes, younger, less educated women, and those from lower social classes are all less likely to breast-feed their children.
Earlier this month, the Scottish Executive was urged to do all it could to encourage more young mothers to breast-feed.