breast milk


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breast milk

Etymology: AS, braest + meoluc
human milk conferring some immunities (bronchiolitis and gastroenteritis are rare in breastfed babies). Infants fed breast milk are less likely to become obese, become constipated, and to have dental malocclusion. Compare colostrum. See also breastfeeding.
Human milk is similar to cow’s milk in water content (88%), specific gravity (1.030), fat content (3.5%), energy value (0.67 kcal/ml) and type of sugar-lactose. Breast milk has fewer minerals, certain vitamins (thiamin and riboflavin), and protein (1.0–1.5% vs. 3.3%) than cow’s milk, the latter due to a 6-fold increased in casein; it has more carbohydrates (6.5–7.0% vs. 4.5%), vitamins C and D, and equivalent amounts of vitamins A and B and niacin; it also contains bradykinin, EGF, gonadotropin-releasing hormone, IGF-I, melatonin, mammotropic growth factor, NGF, oxytocin. It is usually sterile, provides IgA, and is more easily digestible, as reflected in rapid transit time; breast-fed infants have a better response to vaccines than formula-fed infants

breast milk

Neonatology Human milk is similar to cow milk in the water content–88%, specific gravity, 1.030, fat content–3.5%, energy value–0.67 kcal/ml and type of sugar—lactose. See Breast-feeding, La Leche League; Cf Certified milk, Humanized milk, Raw milk, White beverages.

breast milk

Milk obtained from the mammary glands of the human breast. It is the ideal source of nutrition for most infants, since it contains maternal antibodies that protect the child from infection, and other substances that promote development of the brain and the gastrointestinal tract, among other organs. Human breast milk that is collected and refrigerated immediately may be used for up to 5 days. If it is collected, frozen, and stored at −17.7°C (0°F), it is safe for 6 months.

CAUTION!

breast-feeding by mothers with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is not recommended, because of the risk of transmission of HIV to the child.
See also: milk
References in periodicals archive ?
com/HM4HBNY) Human Milk 4 Human Babies (HM4HB) Global Network, that has different pages for different areas in the US (like Ohio, Florida, Georgia, Oregon, Washington and Missouri ) and for other countries (Switzerland, Australia, UK, Sweden, South Africa and UAE) was under controversy after media reported the hidden risks involved in accepting breast milk from strangers.
One (1) ml of each breast milk sample was serially diluted ([10.
This donor breast milk actually helps save these babies' lives.
Most recently the apperance of internet based organisations like Only the Breast and Eats on Feets suggest that the informal practice of sharing breast milk and breastfeeding have been re-established as an infant feeding choice.
One friend sent us off to Houston with 40 ounces of her extra breast milk, so that really helped us get started, and we also were fortunate to have a lot of friends who had recently had babies of their own, so we never had to seek out breast milk from strangers," said Lynn, 36.
The lactation consultant had mentioned an online organization called Eats on Feets (a play on Meals on Wheels) that might offer donor breast milk.
The purchase of breast milk online has been facilitated by websites like onlythebreast.
Such accommodations include sufficient break time and a private room, other than a bathroom, for a woman to pump breast milk.
The proud mum has donated 16 litres of breast milk in the past six months, sending one litre every 10 days to the bank in Co Fermanagh which distributes it to hospitals around the country.
Comment: This study demonstrates that topical application of human breast milk is as effective as topical hydrocortisone for the treatment for diaper rash in infants.
Muscat: Longer paid maternity leave, work-site support, and facilities for expressing and storing breast milk are necessary to encourage breast-feeding among Omani mothers, says an official at the Ministry of Health.
RIO DE JANEIRO -- Thirty years ago, poor Brazilian women were paid for their breast milk, leaving their children at risk of malnourishment.