brassica


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Related to brassica: Brassica juncea, Brassica rapa

brassica

(brăs′ĭ-kă) [L. “cabbage”]
The family of vegetables that includes broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, and cauliflower.

brassica

any member of the family Brassicaceae or Cruciferae, particularly members of the genus Brassica, e.g. cabbage, swede.

Brassica

a genus of plants of the Brassicaceae (Cruciferae) family containing a large number of cultivated plants eaten by humans and food animals. Poisoning with them is rare but under particular growing conditions and if the diet consists almost entirely of the one plant some massive outbreaks of poisoning can occur.
Poisoning syndromes attributed to Brassica spp. include hemolytic anemia (kale anemia) caused by SMCO, goiter from glucosinolates, nitrate/nitrite, photosensitization, blindness (polioencephalomalacia), respiratory distress and rumen stasis.
Includes B. campestris (B. rapa), B. hirta (Sinapis alba), B. juncea (Indian or leaf mustard), B. kaber (Sinapis arvensis), B. napus var. napus (B. napus), B. sinapistrum (Sinapis arvensis).

Brassica alba
annual weed; the seed is used, together with that of B. nigra, to make commercial mustard. The seed, stubble or plant in pod can cause gastroenteritis with signs of abdominal pain, salivation and diarrhea. The toxin is a mixture of isothiocyanates called mustard oil. The enzyme myrosinase is needed to activate the oil and produce irritant effect. Oil cake containing the oil may be nontoxic because myrosinase is inactivated but can become toxic if animal has access to alternative source of the enzyme simultaneously.
Brassica napobrassica
swede turnip.
Brassica napus
rape or canola.
Brassica nigra
seeds are used in mixtures with B. alba in the manufacture of commercial mustard powder. Can cause poisoning as for B. alba (see above).
Brassica oleracea
the commercial vegetables and cultivated fodder plants. Includes B. o. var. acephala (kale, cole, chou moellier), B. o. var. botrytis (cauliflower), B. o. var. capitata (cabbage), B. o. var. gemmifera (Brussel sprouts), B. o. var. italica (broccoli, calabrese).
Brassica rapa
turnip.
Brassica rapa subsp. campestris
turnip rape.
References in periodicals archive ?
Reddy and CABI provide a valuable service by pulling together the world's leading researchers on Brassica oil seed pests, and publishing the most significant publication on this subject to date.
Key words: Episurphus balteatus, Brassica campestris L, Myzus persicae, correlation, regression, Hyderabad.
Brassica vegetables are nutritious with high levels of vitamin C, fiber, and carotenoids.
I often broadcast the blend of radishes, wheat and brassicas over a stand of soybeans.
By identifying the genes involved in accumulating these compounds, the researchers are one step closer to breeding broccoli and related Brassica vegetables like kale and cabbage with mega-doses of phenolic compounds.
1-2); Brassica juncea compared to Brassica juncea + Eisenia foetida (T-6, Fig.
Brassica water extracts (8, 6 and 2% concentrations) had caused highest aphid mortality (25-30%) (Fig.
The natural enemies are not sufficient to control the populations of aphids in Brassica, so the alternative is the use of selective chemicals (Hainan et al.
Keywords: Brassica juncea; Oil Quality; Erucic acid; Oleic acid; Glucosinolate; Path analysis
Alex Grantz, general manager, export, CBC, said: "We are very proud to partner with Brassica that represents the high caliber suppliers CBC seeks to work with.