brand-name drug


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brand-name drug

A drug marketed under a proprietary, trademark-protected name.
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A copayment for a generic drug might be $5, while a copayment for a brand-name drug on the formulary might be $15, and a copayment for a brand-name drug not on the formulary might be $25.
A generic therapeutic alternative treats a health condition in the same way as the brand-name drug, but uses different active ingredients.
The basic requirements for approval of generic and brand-name drugs are the same.
Key drivers determining drug pricing and volume trends are the second year of Medicare Part D programs, brand-name drug patent expirations paired with rapid generic substitution rates, and possible increased political pressure from the change of political control of Congress.
A look at the brand-name drugs whose patents are close to expiring.
Highmark benefits, too, because the health insurer can better manage the cost of prescription drugs since generics are less expensive than brand-name drugs, while still maintaining the same high-quality prescription care.
Health care plans are closely examining studies that point to the growing role of direct-to-consumer advertising and how it may lead some consumers to ask for brand-name drugs when generic versions, offering value and less out-of-pocket expense, are also available.
Common challenges/opportunities for these participants will arise in 2006 from the implementation of the Medicare Prescription Drug Improvement and Modernization Act of 2003, and the flood of brand-name drugs that will potentially lose market exclusivity throughout the year.
Generic drugs, he said, are provided to the consumer at prices greatly lower than those of brand-name drugs because promotional costs are minimal, profits are low, and there is inter-generic competition.
Generic prescription drugs approved by the FDA have the same high quality and strength as brand-name drugs.
In Fulgenzi, the brand-name drug Reglan received approval from the Food and Drug Administration to add the phrase "Therapy should not exceed 12 weeks in duration" to its label.
All three cases involve patients who took metoclopramide, the generic version of the brand-name drug Reglan