branch

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branch

 [branch]
a division or offshoot from a main stem, especially of blood vessels, nerves, or lymphatics. Called also ramus.
bundle branch a branch of the bundle of His.

branch

(branch), [TA]
An offshoot; in anatomy, one of the primary divisions of a nerve or blood vessel. A branch. See: ramus, artery, nerve, vein.
Synonym(s): ramus (1) [TA]

branch

(branch) ramus; a division or offshoot from a main stem, especially of blood vessels, nerves, or lymphatics.
bundle branch  a branch of the bundle of His.

branch

(brănch)
n.
Something that resembles a branch of a tree, as in form or function, as:
a. A secondary outgrowth or subdivision of a main axis, such as the tine of a deer's antlers.
b. Anatomy An offshoot or a division of the main portion of a structure, especially that of a nerve, blood vessel, or lymphatic vessel; a ramus.
v. branched, branching, branches
v.intr.
To put forth a branch or branches; spread by dividing.

branch′less adj.
branch′y adj.

branch

(in anatomy) an offshoot arising from the main trunk of a nerve or blood vessel.

branch

A division of a thing into smaller subunits, which remain connected to the original whole in a tree-like, arborescing fashion. Branching is typical of anatomic structures that divide the further they are from their origin—e.g., arterioles, venules, bronchioles and nerves.

branch

(branch)
An offshoot; in anatomy, one of the primary divisions of a nerve or blood vessel.
See: ramus, artery, nerve, vein
Synonym(s): ramus (1) .
[Fr. branche, related to L. brachium, arm]

branch

primary division of nerve/blood vessel (see ramus)

branch

(branch)
[TA] An offshoot; in anatomy, one of the primary divisions of a nerve or blood vessel.
See: ramus, artery, nerve, vein
[Fr. branche, related to L. brachium, arm]

branch

1. ramus; a division or offshoot from a main stem, especially of blood vessels, nerves or lymphatics.
2. the bearing surface of the horseshoe that supports the wall of the hoof. There is a lateral and a medial branch.

bundle branch
a branch of the bundle of His.
communicating gray branch
postganglionic nerve fibers coursing between the sympathetic ganglia and the spinal nerves; destined for skin glands, blood vessels and the like; join spinal and cranial nerves.
communicating white branch
preganglionic fibers of the sympathetic system originate in the lateral columns of the spinal cord and pass to the spinal nerves and then, via the communicating white fibers, to the ganglia of the sympathetic trunk.
References in periodicals archive ?
Into this void, McMaster cast her "two dozen day-glo pink announcements," and by December 1973 the preview issue of Branching Out was in circulation (see figure 2), graced with poems by Margaret Atwood; a short story by Dorothy Livesay; articles on "Indian Rights for Indian Women," latchkey kids, and champion trap shooter Sue Nattrass; an interview with Margaret Laurence by June Sheppard; and book reviews by Maureen Scobie and Susan Musgrave.
Very few sources exist that refer to Branching Out in any detail.
While references to Branching Out that help contextualize its relationship to the larger field of feminist periodical publishing and to the larger women's movement are relatively few, they are nonetheless revealing.
Feminist Print Media" and "Update on Feminist Periodicals" were written and submitted two and five years after Branching Out folded, but because they rely on contemporary and historical data to outline the "social impact and financial context of feminist newspapers and magazines in Canada," they provide invaluable insight into the field in which Branching Out operated.
Wachtel goes on to characterize Branching Out in terms of a readers survey conducted by Branching Out in 1975; this survey "revealed that many subscribed not simply because it was feminist, but Canadian feminist" (16).
From its inception, Branching Out positioned itself as a rival of both Ms.