branchial arches


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Related to branchial arches: Branchial cyst, branchial fistula

bran·chi·al arch·es

typically, six arches in vertebrates; in lower vertebrates, they bear gills; they are pharyngeal arches in human embryos. Compare: pharyngeal arches.

branchial arches

Etymology: Gk, branchia, gills; L, arcus, bow
arched structures in the embryonic pharynx.

branchial arches

the cartilagenous or bony masses supporting the gills of fish. There are usually five pairs of arches.

bran·chi·al arch·es

(brang'kē-ăl ahr'chĕz)
Typically, six arches in vertebrates; in lower vertebrates, they bear gills; they are pharyngeal arches (q.v.) in human embryos.

branchial, branchiogenic, branchiogenous

pertaining to, or resembling, gills of a fish or derivatives of homologous parts in higher forms.

branchial arches
paired arched columns that bear the gills in lower aquatic vertebrates and which, in embryos of higher vertebrates, become modified into structures of the face, mandible, ear and neck.
branchial clefts
the clefts between the branchial arches of the embryo, formed by rupture of the membrane separating corresponding entodermal pouch and ectodermal groove.
branchial cyst
a cyst formed deep within the neck from an incompletely closed branchial cleft, usually located between the second and third branchial arches. The branchial arches develop during early embryonic life and are separated by four clefts. As the fetus develops, these arches grow to form structures within the head and neck. Two of the arches grow together and enclose the cervical sinus, a cavity in the neck. A branchial cyst may develop within the cervical sinus. Called also branchiogenic or branchiogenous cyst. Seen rarely in dogs as a slowly developing swelling in the pharyngeal area, filled with saliva.
branchial groove
an external furrow lined with ectoderm, occurring in the embryo between two branchial arches.
References in periodicals archive ?
Viewed simultaneously through the endoscope, the distance between the ceratobranchials and the oropharyngeal roof increased, signifying abduction of the branchial arches.
Through the endoscope, this flow reversal was accompanied by a marked abduction of the branchial arches.
The Eustachian tube is an endodermal structure opening in the nasopharynx formed from two branchial arches.
Suggestions of a thyroglossal duct or bronchogenic origin notwithstanding, the consensus is that the lesion is caused by a failure of the fusion of the paired second branchial arches in the midline during the third and fourth weeks of fetal development.
Branchial arches develop into the musculoskeletal and vascular components of the head and neck.
The relevance of these anatomic details to our discussion of the facial nerve is that the muscles associated with the branchial arches and jaws are innervated by a special set of visceral motor components of the cranial nerves.
In the embryology of present-day mammals, the developmental process in the bones and muscles of the first and second branchial arches involves a re-enactment of the evolutionary process than begot the mammalian middle ear.
Aberrant internal carotid arteries are caused by an embryogenic malformation of the first and second branchial arches.
For many years during the first half of the 20th century, it was well accepted that the middle ear develops primarily from the first and second branchial arches and that the ossicles are derived from various contributions by Meckel's cartilage, Reichert's cartilage, and the otic capsule.
The characteristic craniofacial features of this syndrome are believed to be the result of unilateral fetal developmental abnormalities of the first and second branchial arches.
What differentiates these internal branchial cysts from other cysts of the first, second, third, and fourth branchial arches is the fact that they form only in the pharynx and they do not produce any neck swelling.
Congenital dermoid cysts are believed to arise from epithelial debris or rests that become trapped during the midline fusion of the branchial arches.