branchial


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Related to branchial: Branchial cleft cyst, branchial fistula, Branchial cyst, branchial sinus, branchial apparatus

branchial

 [brang´ke-al]
pertaining to, or resembling, gills of a fish or derivatives of homologous parts in higher animals.
branchial cyst a cyst formed deep within the neck from an incompletely closed pharyngeal groove (branchial cleft), usually between the second and third pharyngeal arches (branchial arches). These two arches grow together and enclose the cervical sinus in the neck, which is a common site of a branchial cyst. Called also branchiogenic or branchiogenous cyst.

bran·chi·al

(brang'kē-ăl),
1. Relating to branchiae or gills (for example, in fish).
2. In human embryology, denoting the various structures constituting the pharyngeal apparatus.

branchial

/bran·chi·al/ (brang´ke-al) pertaining to or resembling gills of a fish or derivatives of homologous parts in higher forms.

branchial

(brăng′kē-əl)
adj.
Of, relating to, or resembling the gills of a fish, their homologous embryonic structures, or the derivatives of their homologous parts in mammals: branchial muscles.

branchial

[brang′kē·əl]
Etymology: Gk, branchia, gills
pertaining to body structures of the face, neck, and throat area, particularly the muscles.

branchial

adjective Pertaining to branchiae or gills.

branchial, branchiogenic, branchiogenous

pertaining to, or resembling, gills of a fish or derivatives of homologous parts in higher forms.

branchial arches
paired arched columns that bear the gills in lower aquatic vertebrates and which, in embryos of higher vertebrates, become modified into structures of the face, mandible, ear and neck.
branchial clefts
the clefts between the branchial arches of the embryo, formed by rupture of the membrane separating corresponding entodermal pouch and ectodermal groove.
branchial cyst
a cyst formed deep within the neck from an incompletely closed branchial cleft, usually located between the second and third branchial arches. The branchial arches develop during early embryonic life and are separated by four clefts. As the fetus develops, these arches grow to form structures within the head and neck. Two of the arches grow together and enclose the cervical sinus, a cavity in the neck. A branchial cyst may develop within the cervical sinus. Called also branchiogenic or branchiogenous cyst. Seen rarely in dogs as a slowly developing swelling in the pharyngeal area, filled with saliva.
branchial groove
an external furrow lined with ectoderm, occurring in the embryo between two branchial arches.
References in periodicals archive ?
The abnormalities were consistent with a branchial cyst with carcinoma and cervicocephalic air sac, subcutaneous, and infraorbital sinus metastases.
Gill rakers in Cetorhinus maximus are present on both sides of each of the five branchial arches.
Second branchial cleft anomalies are the most common branchial apparatus deformities, representing 95% of all lesions, with cysts being more common than fistulae and sinuses.
The pharyngobranchial region, the part of the animal posterior to the mouth and ventral to the orbits and pectoral fins, is generally not well preserved, and the number of branchial pouches and branchial openings is uncertain.
According to Plisetskaya et al [133] preparations from salmon brain stimulated the [35S] sulfate uptake into salmon branchial cartilage with a potency comparable to pure mammalian or salmon insulins but lower than that of mammalian insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I).
Animal studies have indicated that embryonic cells associated with the development of the branchial arch, mandible, frontonasal and maxillary prominences, and ocular and auditory structures are particularly vulnerable to exposure to alcohol (Dunty 2001).
Clinical Seminars: Recurrent acute suppurative thyroiditis in an adult due to fourth branchial pouch fistula.
Branchial chloride cells in larvae and juveniles of freshwater tilapia Oreochromis mossambicus.
Clarias species of the family Clariidae is commonly called the "Mudfish" and apart from tilapia, Clarias is the most cultured fish species in Nigeria and are generally strong fish, they possess an accessory respiratory organ, composed of a paired pear shaped air chamber containing two arborescent structures located on the fourth branchial arcs, that are supported by cartilage and covered by highly vascularised tissue which can absorb oxygen directly from the atmosphere.
Topics include immune and osmoregulatory interaction, the renin-angiotensin systems of fish, the effects of water acidity and hardness on the survival and growth of freshwater teleosts, cellular and molecular approaches, fish transportation, extreme or unstable habitats and their impact on teleosts, renal contributions to water and salt balance, immunochemistry in branchial ion transport, rapid regulation of ion transport in mitochondrion-rich cells, and the effects of diet, arginine vasotocin and isotocin, energy metabolism and osmotic acclimation, intestinal transport processes, calcium, prolactin, growth hormones, insulin-like growth factors, cortisol and the thyroid gland.
For the circulatory system, students are asked what the advantage of a pulmonary system would be over a branchial system, and the advantage of having two ventricles in the heart instead of one.