brainstem


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Related to brainstem: midbrain, pons, brainstem glioma

brainstem

 [brān´stem]
the stemlike portion of the brain connecting the cerebral hemispheres with the spinal cord, and comprising the pons, medulla oblongata, and midbrain; considered by some to include the diencephalon. Also written brain stem.

brain·stem

, brain stem (brān'stem), [TA]
Originally, the entire unpaired subdivision of the brain, composed of (in anterior sequence) the rhombencephalon, mesencephalon, and diencephalon as distinguished from the brain's only paired subdivision, the telencephalon. More recently, the term's connotation has undergone several arbitrary modifications: some use it to denote no more than rhombencephalon plus mesencephalon, distinguishing that complex from the prosencephalon (diencephalon plus telencephalon); others restrict it even further to refer exclusively to the rhombencephalon. From both developmental and architectural viewpoints, the original interpretation seems preferable.
Synonym(s): truncus encephali [TA]

brainstem

(brān´stem″) the stemlike portion of the brain connecting the cerebral hemispheres with the spinal cord, and comprising the pons, medulla oblongata, and midbrain; considered by some to include the diencephalon.

brainstem

or

brain stem

(brān′stĕm′)
n.
The portion of the brain, consisting of the medulla oblongata, pons Varolii, and midbrain, that connects the spinal cord to the forebrain and cerebrum.

brainstem

Etymology: AS, bragen + stemm
the portion of the brain comprising the medulla oblongata, the pons, and the mesencephalon. It performs motor, sensory, and reflex functions and contains the corticospinal and reticulospinal tracts. The 12 pairs of cranial nerves from the brain arise mostly from the brainstem. Compare medulla oblongata, mesencephalon, pons.

brainstem

The central stalk-like axis of the lower CNS, which connects the brain with the spinal cord.
 
Components
• Medulla oblongata;
• Pons;
• Midbrain;
• Diencephalon.
 
Functions
• Transmission and “lower cortical” processing of sensory neural impulses from the periphery and motor impulses to muscles and other effectors;
• Anatomic site of egress of cranial nerves 3 to 12;
• Reticular functions, integrating cardiorespiratory control, arousal and alertness, consciousness.

brain·stem

, brain stem (brān'stem) [TA]
Originally, the entire unpaired subdivision of the brain, composed of the rhombencephalon, mesencephalon, and diencephalon as distinguished from the brain's only paired subdivision, the telencephalon. More recently, the connotation of the term has undergone several arbitrary modifications: some use it to denote no more than rhombencephalon plus mesencephalon, distinguishing that complex from the prosencephalon (diencephalon plus telencephalon); others restrict it even further to refer exclusively to the rhombencephalon. From both developmental and architectural viewpoints, the original interpretation seems preferable.

brainstem

(brān′stĕm″)
Enlarge picture
BRAINSTEM
The stemlike part of the brain that connects the cerebral hemispheres with the spinal cord. It includes the diencephalin, midbrain, and hindbrain. Some anatomists do not include the diencephalon in the brainstem. See: illustration

brainstem

The part of the brain consisting of the medulla oblongata and pons, which connects the main brain (cerebrum) to the spinal cord. The brainstem contains the ‘vital centres’ for respiration and heart-beat and the nuclei of most of the CRANIAL NERVES as well as massive motor and sensory nerve trunks passing to and from the cord.

Brainstem

Brain structure closest to the spinal cord, involved in controlling vital functions, movement, sensation, and nerves supplying the head and neck.

brainstem

distal brain area, initiating and coordinating basic life reflexes (e.g. breathing, heart beat)

brain·stem

, brain stem (brān'stem) [TA]
Originally, the entire unpaired subdivision of the brain, composed of the rhombencephalon, mesencephalon, and diencephalon as distinguished from the brain's only paired subdivision, the telencephalon. More recently, the connotation of the term has undergone several arbitrary modifications: some use it to denote no more than rhombencephalon plus mesencephalon, distinguishing that complex from the prosencephalon (diencephalon plus telencephalon); others restrict it even further to refer exclusively to the rhombencephalon. From both developmental and architectural viewpoints, the original interpretation seems preferable.

brainstem,

n the portion of the brain comprising the medulla oblongata, pons, and mesencephalon. It performs motor, sensory, and reflex functions.

brainstem

the stemlike portion of the brain connecting the cerebral hemispheres with the spinal cord, and comprising the pons, medulla oblongata and midbrain; considered by some to include the diencephalon. See also reticular activating system, ascending reticular formation, thalamus.

brainstem auditory evoked response
see brainstem auditory evoked response.
brainstem hemorrhage
results from cranial trauma and characteristically causes unconsciousness with varying types and degrees of motor paralysis and irregularities of respiration, depending on the site.
brainstem reticular formation
see reticular activating system.
References in periodicals archive ?
Vestibular compensation occurs from neuronal changes in the cerebellum and in the brainstem in response to sensory conflicts produced by vestibular disease.
3] The prodrome is followed by the onset of focal signs of lower brainstem and cerebellar involvement.
The auditory brainstem implant procedure is said to be the only effective sensory prosthetic for direct brain stimulation in cases that do not benefit from traditional methods like hearing aids or cochlear implants (CI).
Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis presenting as a solitary brainstem mass.
Before treatment, the brainstem functions of bedwetting children are altered leading to impaired bladder function, sleep and awakening threshold.
The study was based on an examination of brainstem tissue from 31 infants who died of SIDS and 10 who died of other causes between 1997 and 2005.
Key Words: brainstem infarction, cardiac catheterization, peduncular hallucinations
The brainstems from nicotine-exposed pups had far more of these GABA receptors than the tissue from saline-exposed rats did.
A developmental anomaly in an area of the brainstem that may sense carbon dioxide in the blood and that may help regulate respiration appears to be the physiologic root of at least some cases of sudden infant death syndrome, Dr.
Acroname is now in the process of launching its BrainStem, an interface that will allow PPRK users to ditch the Palm in favor of software written on the desktop.
UCLA team's next step will be to locate the same set of neurons in a human brainstem, then compare their physiology and function with the neurons of people with breathing disorders.