brain-gut axis

brain-gut axis

A functional neurogastrointestinal unit which links the endocrine and nervous systems through hormonal peptides—e.g., bombesin, CCK, enkephalin, gastrin, neurotensin, somatostatin, substance P, VIP and others—that also serve as neurotransmitters.

brain-gut ax·is

(brān-gŭt ak'sis)
The continuous feedback loop between sensory neurons in the gastrointestinal tract and motor response generated in the central nervous system. Hypersensitivity in the brain-gut axis contributes to functional GI disorders, including irritable bowel syndrome.
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References in periodicals archive ?
There is a direct connection between the gut and the brain, and this is called the brain-gut axis,' says Dr Rob.
For Life, being published in May, he sets out the thinking behind the latest research about the brain-gut axis and spells out the simple steps we can take to improve brain health.
The brain-gut axis is a two-way neural pathway which links cortical centers in the brain with intestinal sensation and intestinal motor function.
Mumper emphasized the high prevalence of gut disorders in autism and reviewed the evidence for complex lines of communication between the brain and the gut known as the brain-gut axis.
The brain-gut axis in irritable bowel syndrome-Clinical aspects.
Neuroscientists, psychologists, and psychiatrists from the US, Europe, Asia, and Canada describe basic aspects of the immunology of neuroinflammation, the roles of stress and neurotoxins, inflammation and the role of glucocorticoids in depression, virus infection as a cause of inflammation in psychiatric disorders, essential fatty acids as potential anti-inflammatory agents in the treatment of affective disorders, and the brain-gut axis as a site for treating depression and stress-related disorders using probiotics.
Pharmos discovers and develops novel therapeutics to treat a range of metabolic and nervous system disorders, including gout, disorders of the brain-gut axis (e.
One of the brain's most significant links with the rest of the body is through the intestine, known as the brain-gut axis.
The molecular cross-talk of HPA axis and brain-gut axis and the new discoveries made possible the neuroendocrine mapping of the gastrointestinal tract and enhanced the perspectives for novel molecular therapeutic interventions targeting the brain-gut axis.
One current concept is that noxious stimuli in the gut activate the brain-gut axis, resulting in stimulation of fear and arousal centers in the central nervous system.
The connections between the two systems are so tight that scientists often refer to them as one entity: the brain-gut axis.