brain implant


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brain im·plant

(brān im'plant)
Any substance or structure that is placed surgically intracranially.

brain implant

Any substance, tissue, or object placed surgically in the brain.
See also: implant
References in periodicals archive ?
Sarpeshkar's group is a leader in the field of ultra-low-power electronics, having pioneered such designs for cochlear implants and brain implants.
Toby Stephens plays Vincent McCarthy, a doctor who is pioneering brain implants for seriously wounded soldiers at the same time that his own daughter Mary (Jade Croot) is ailing.
Deep brain stimulation with a constant-current implant significantly increased "on" time in patients with Parkinson's disease, with an increase of almost 3 hours more than a group of control patients who had inactive brain implants.
Other chapters describe ultra-low-power building-block circuits that are useful in biomedical electronics, followed by chapters that describe the utilization of these circuits in implantable and noninvasive medical systems such as cochlear implants for the deaf, brain implants for the blind and paralyzed, cardiac devices for non-invasive medical monitoring, and biomolecular sensing systems.
It might also provide an improved method of attaching neural prosthetics, such as artificial arms that are controlled by pectoral muscles, or deep brain implants used for treating depression.
Surveys have shown previously that a fair percentage of people would consider getting web-enabled brain implants that would allow them to make phone calls, surf the web and do many other things, all with the power of their brain.
The funded projects include a Phase IIa clinical trial of a compound derived from a Chinese herb, representing the first modern era clinical study of an herbal-derived compound for epilepsy; research of a galanin-based therapy for a much-needed new treatment of refractory epilepsy; and the development of biodegradable adenosine-releasing brain implants for the treatment of temporal lobe epilepsy.
At a private Massachusetts company and at Duke University in North Carolina, researchers have connected brain implants in rhesus monkeys to computers that read the patterns of neurons that fire as the monkeys use joysticks to play simple video games.
Most nightmarishly, some worried that governments could one day use brain implants to monitor and perhaps even control citizens' behavior.
The more encouraging research (that has nonetheless resulted in bitter controversy) is the use of fetal-tissue brain implants in Parkinson's patients.
In a long-term perspective, the project aims microscopic sensors that may future be integrated with brain implants designed to restore local neuronal activity and/or NT release, such as deep brain stimulation electrodes, implanted to treat PD.