brachial plexus anesthesia

brachial plexus anesthesia

an anesthetic block of the upper extremity, performed by injecting local anesthetic near the plexus formed by the last four cervical and first two thoracic spinal nerves. The plexus extends from the transverse processes of the spine to the apex of the axilla, where the terminal nerves are formed. Because of the anatomy of this area, many approaches are possible. Approaches include the axillary (in the armpit), supraclavicular and infraclavicular (above and below the collarbone), and interscalene (between the anterior and middle scalene muscles of the neck). Various approaches may result in Horner's syndrome, phrenic nerve block, pneumothorax, recurrent laryngeal paralysis, persistent sensory deficits, venous or arterial puncture, subarachnoid injection, paresthesias, or hematoma. Also called brachial plexus block. See also regional anesthesia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Interscalene brachial plexus anesthesia and analgesia for open shoulder surgery: a randomized, double-blinded comparison between levobupivacaine and ropivacaine.
Key Words: brachial plexus anesthesia, hypercarbia, interscalene anesthesia, regional anesthesia, transcutaneous carbon dioxide monitoring
Eligible patients were those aged 18 years or older presenting for shoulder or upper arm surgery that was amenable to brachial plexus anesthesia using the IS approach.
2] was noted in the patients who did not have successful brachial plexus anesthesia.
In addition, because no change was noted in patients who did not have successful brachial plexus anesthesia, we would postulate that the changes are directly related to IS anesthesia.