box jellyfish


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Invertebrates of the Class Cubozoa, which include Chironex fleckeri, Carukia barnesi—irukandji jellyfish—and Chiropsolmus quadrigatus, many, but not all of which are lethal
Management Vinegar is the only effective way to disable the box jellyfish’s nematocyts and stop further discharge into the bloodstream

box jellyfish

Any of several species of jellyfish of the class Cubozoa, known for their extremely lethal venom.
See: Cubozoa; sea wasp

box jellyfish

members of the order Cubomedusae in the class Schyphozoa. They carry potent venom sufficient to kill an adult human. There are no records of animal mortality. Called also sea wasp.
References in periodicals archive ?
There are documented box jellyfish stings in the country, with cases reported in the Lingayen Gulf in Pangasinan province, Yanagihara told disaster response officials from coastal towns and cities on Tuesday.
Almost 15 years later, box jellyfish warnings in Thailand are still rare and the deaths still under-reported.
In several tropical to subtropical localities, species of the box jellyfish genus Alatina display monthly nearshore aggregations (Thomas et al.
Box jellyfish (Chironexfleckeri), which roam the seas off northern Australia, deliver some of nature's most potent venom.
Although not a concern in Florida waters, only vinegar should be used for Australia's box jellyfish stings.
Professor Jamie Seymour, of James Cook University in Cairns, said: "When you see people who have been stung by box jellyfish with that number of tentacle contacts on their body, it's usually in a morgue.
The box jellyfish is the most venomous creature known on earth.
You would need to have eyes like the box jellyfish, with its 16 light-sensitive eyes and eight acute camera-like eyes all--24 eyes hanging down on stalks.
The deadliest creature in the sea is the box jellyfish, Chironex fleckeri, which is found off northern Australia, Indonesia, and Malaysia.
In Australia box jellyfish have killed as many as 65 people in a year, with most of the victims dying in less than three minutes.
But the city has had several good reasons for turning its back on the sea: tides that can rise almost 9m high, marine predators, lethal box jellyfish and threat of inundation from cyclonic surges.