sound

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sound

 [sownd]
1. a slender instrument to be introduced into body passages or cavities, especially for the dilatation of strictures or detection of foreign bodies.
Sound. From Dorland's, 2000.
2. the sensation resulting from stimulation of the ear by vibrations of air or some other elastic medium with a frequency between 20 and 20,000 Hz.
3. a noise, normal or abnormal, heard within the body; see also under bruit, fremitus, murmur, and rale.
adventitious s's abnormal auscultatory sounds heard over the lungs, such as rales, rhonchi, or any of the abnormal types of resonance; they are usually characterized as either continuous or discontinuous sounds. See also breath sounds.
auscultatory s's sounds heard on auscultation, such as heart sounds, breath sounds, adventitious sounds, and Korotkoff sounds.
bowel s's high-pitched abdominal sounds caused by propulsion of the contents of the intestines; see also bowel sounds.
breath s's the sounds of air moving through the tracheobronchial tree, heard during auscultation of the chest. There are four main types: bronchial breath sounds are high-pitched ones heard normally over the manubrium sterni but indicative of consolidation or compression when heard elsewhere; bronchovesicular breath sounds are intermediate between bronchial and vesicular and are normal on certain peripheral parts of the thorax but indicative of partial consolidation if heard over a lung; cavernous breath sounds are abnormal ones with a hollow resonance heard over a cavity in a lung; and vesicular breath sounds are low-pitched ones heard over the normal lung during ventilation. Called also respiratory sounds.
continuous s's adventitious sounds that last longer than 0.2 sec; they include wheezes and rhonchi.
discontinuous s's adventitious sounds that last less than 0.2 sec and come in a series; the most common kind are rales (crackles).
ejection s's high-pitched clicking sounds heard in septal defects just after the first heart sound, attributed to sudden distention of a dilated pulmonary artery or aorta or to forceful opening of the pulmonic or aortic cusps.
friction sound friction rub.
heart s's see heart sounds.
Korotkoff s's sounds heard during auscultatory determination of blood pressure, thought to be produced by vibratory motion of the arterial wall as the artery suddenly distends when compressed by a pneumatic blood pressure cuff. Origin of the sound may be within the blood passing through the vessel or within the wall itself.
percussion sound any sound obtained by percussion.
physiological s's those heard when an external acoustic meatus is plugged, caused by the rush of blood through blood vessels in or near the inner ear and by adjacent muscles in continuous low-frequency vibration.
respiratory s's breath sounds.
succussion s's splashing sounds heard on succussion over a distended stomach or in hydropneumothorax.
to-and-fro sound to-and-fro murmur.
urethral sound a long, slender instrument for exploring and dilating the urethra.
voice s's auscultatory sounds heard over the lungs or airways when the patient speaks; increased resonance indicates consolidation or effusion. Types include bronchophony, egophony, laryngophony, and tracheophony.
white sound that produced by a mixture of all frequencies of mechanical vibration perceptible as sound.

sound

(sownd),
1. The vibrations produced by a sounding body, transmitted by the air or other medium, and perceived by the internal ear.
2. An elongated cylindric, usually curved, metal instrument, used for exploring the bladder or other cavities of the body, for dilating strictures of the urethra, esophagus, or other canal, for calibrating the lumen of a body cavity, or for detecting the presence of a foreign body in a body cavity.
3. To explore or calibrate a cavity with a sound.
4. Whole; healthy; not diseased or injured.

sound

(sound)
1. a pressure wave propagating through an elastic medium; waves with a frequency of 20–20,000 Hz cause the sensation of hearing.
2. the effect produced on the organ of hearing by vibrations of the air or other medium.
3. a noise, normal or abnormal, heard within the body.
4. an instrument to be introduced into a cavity to detect a foreign body or to dilate a stricture.

adventitious sounds  abnormal auscultatory sounds heard over the lung, such as rales, rhonchi, or abnormal resonance.
aortic second sound  the audible vibrations related to the closure of the aortic valve; symbol A2.
auscultatory sounds  those heard on auscultation, such as breath sounds, heart sounds, and adventitious sounds.
breath sounds  respiratory s's; sounds heard on auscultation over the respiratory tract; bronchial and ventricular ones are heard normally at certain places, whereas a cavernous one indicates a lung cavity.
continuous sounds  adventitious sounds lasting longer than 0.2 sec, such as wheezes and rhonchi.
discontinuous sounds  adventitious sounds lasting less than 0.2 sec and coming in a series; the most common are rales.
ejection sounds  high-pitched clicking sounds heard just after the first heart sound, at maximal opening of the semilunar valves; seen in patients with valvular abnormalities or dilatations of aortic or pulmonary arteries.
friction sound  see under rub.
heart sounds  sounds heard over the cardiac region, produced by the functioning of the heart. The first, at the beginning of ventricular systole, is dull, firm, and prolonged, and heard as a “lubb” sound; the second, produced mainly by closure of the semilunar valves, is shorter and sharper than the first and is heard as a “dupp” sound; the third is usually audible only in youth; and the fourth is normally inaudible.
hippocratic sounds  succussion s's.
Korotkoff sounds  sounds heard during auscultatory determination of blood pressure.
percussion sound  any sound obtained by percussion.
pulmonic second sound  the audible vibrations related to the closure of the pulmonary valve; symbol P2.
respiratory sounds  breath s's.
succussion sounds  splashing sounds heard on succussion over a distended stomach or in hydropneumothorax.
to-and-fro sound  see under murmur.
urethral sound  a long, slender instrument for exploring and dilating the urethra.
valvular ejection sound  an ejection sound resulting from abnormality of one or both semilunar valves.
vascular ejection sound  an ejection sound resulting from abnormality of the pulmonary artery or aorta without abnormality of either semilunar valve.
voice sounds  auscultatory sounds heard over the lungs or airways when the patient speaks; increased resonance indicates consolidation or effusion.
white sound  that produced by a mixture of all frequencies of mechanical vibration perceptible as sound.

sound 1

(sound)
n.
1.
a. Vibrations transmitted through an elastic solid or a liquid or gas, with frequencies in the approximate range of 20 to 20,000 hertz, capable of being detected by human organs of hearing.
b. Transmitted vibrations of any frequency.
c. The sensation stimulated in the organs of hearing by such vibrations in the air or other medium.
d. Such sensations considered as a group.
v.tr.
To examine (a body organ or part) by causing to emit sound; auscultate.

sound 2

(sound)
v. sounded, sounding, sounds
v.tr.
To probe (a body cavity) with a sound.
v.intr.
n.
An instrument used to examine or explore body cavities, as for foreign bodies or other abnormalities, or to dilate strictures in them.

sound′a·ble adj.

sound

Etymology: L, sub, under, unde, wave
an emission detected by an instrument used to locate the opening of a cavity or canal, to test the patency of a canal, to ascertain the depth of a cavity, or to reveal the contents of a canal or cavity. A sound is used to determine the depth of the uterus, to detect stones in the bladder, and, less commonly, to assist in correctly inserting a urinary catheter in the urethra through the urinary meatus.

sound

Physics
noun Electromechanical energy sensed by the auditory apparatus.
 
Surgery
noun A simple device used to assess the length of a nonpregnant uterus before performing an endometrial biopsy.

sound

noun Physics Electromechanical energy sensed by the auditory apparatus. See Bowel sound, Dive bomber sound, First heart sound, Fourth heart sound, Korotkov sound, Second heart sound, Third heart sound Surgery A simple device used to assess the length of a nonpregnant uterus before performing an endometrial Bx. See Probe.

sound

(sownd)
1. The vibrations produced by a sounding body, transmitted by the air or other medium, and perceived by the internal ear.
2. An elongated cylindric, usually curved, instrument of metal, used for exploring the bladder or other cavities of the body, for dilating strictures of the urethra, esophagus, or other canal, for calibrating the lumen of a body cavity, or for detecting the presence of a foreign body in a body cavity.
3. To explore or calibrate a cavity with a sound.
4. Whole; healthy; not diseased or injured.

sound

(sownd)
1. Vibrations produced by a sounding body, transmitted in air or other medium, and perceived by internal ear.
2. An elongated cylindric, usually curved, metal instrument, used to explore bladder or other body cavities, to dilate strictures of the urethra, esophagus, or other canal, to calibrate lumen of body cavity, or to detect presence of a foreign body in a body cavity.
3. To explore or calibrate a cavity with a sound.

sound

1. percept resulting from stimulation of the ear by mechanical radiant energy, the frequency depending on the species.
2. a slender instrument to be introduced into body passages or cavities, especially for the dilatation of strictures or detection of foreign bodies.
3. a noise, normal or abnormal, emanating from within the body.
4. strong, in good condition and without significant defects, e.g. said of wool which has sufficient tensile strength to resist the rigors of processing; said also of teeth as sound mouth.

ejection s's
high-pitched clicking sounds heard very shortly after the first heart sound, attributed to sudden distention of a dilated pulmonary artery or aorta or to forceful opening of the pulmonic or aortic cusps.
friction sound
one produced by rubbing of two surfaces.
heart s's
the sounds produced by the functioning of the heart. See heart sounds.
Korotkoff's s's
those heard during auscultatory blood pressure determination.
percussion sound
any sound obtained by percussion.
respiratory sound
any sound heard on ausculation over the respiratory tract.
succussion s's
splashing sounds heard on succussion over a distended stomach or in hydropneumothorax.
to-and-fro sound
a peculiar friction sound or murmur heard in pericarditis and pleurisy.
urethral sound
a long, slender instrument for exploring and dilating the urethra.
sound waves
sound, the stimulus for hearing, consists of patterns of pressure waves generated in and passed through the air.
white sound
that produced by a mixture of all frequencies of mechanical vibration perceptible as sound.
sound wool
wool with no breaks in it that will stand up to the pressures of scouring, spinning and weaving.

Patient discussion about sound

Q. what causes the sound of cracking noises in the head all the time it was said i had acute sinusitis but honestly i think it is more . I don't know why i have cracking noises in my head . I am very concerned about this also my neck is always stiff feeling and aching all the time. . My eyes are very tired and i see blue spots and they hurt behind the eye very badly . I have headaches very often

A. wow...that really sounds serious...i have chronic sinusitis and i can tell you i had horrible headaches but nothing like you describe now. i would strongly consider going to a hospital and checking it out...
tell us what was the result!

Q. Atkins diet? Is it good as it sounds? I'm 17..about 5'2 145 lbs.. I need to lose as much weight as possible in 3 weeks ..Anyone know what kind of results i can expect on atkins?

A. I originally did Atkins 4 years ago. I lost 30 lbs in 3 months and kept if off about a year. I gradually started cheating more and more and exercising less, until now it's all back. Atkins works for me because I naturally crave protein. I am ok with eating lots of eggs. But, the weight only comes off if exercise is included in the plan.

Q. what kind of uses the medicine do with computers related to ultra sound? how does the computer helps the doctors in the ultra sound? what do the compuers use for?

A. the computers help the doctors (in ultrasound cases) to interpret/convert the ultrasound waves into a specific imaging showed in the monitor. by that a doctor can find what is normal or not inside the patient's body.
for pregnancy purposes, it really helps patient in antenatal screening to find some abnormalities (if there's any) and to monitor the fetus' development along the 9-months pregnancy.

yesterday I wrote a short article about ultrasound update : http://doctoradhi.com/blog/?p=388

More discussions about sound