bovine

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Related to bovine epizootic fever: Rift Valley fever

bovine

 [bo´vīn]
pertaining to, characteristic of, or derived from the ox (cattle).

bo·vine

(bō'vīn, -vin),
Relating to cattle.
[L. bos (bov-), ox]

bovine

/bo·vine/ (bo´vīn) pertaining to, characteristic of, or derived from cattle.

bovine

(bō′vīn′, -vēn′)
adj.
Of, relating to, or resembling a ruminant mammal of the bovid subfamily Bovinae, such as a cow, ox, or buffalo, especially one in the genus Bos.
n.
An animal of the subfamily Bovinae, especially one of the genus Bos.

bovine

adjective Relating or referring to a cow; cowlike.

bo·vine

(bō'vīn)
Relating to cattle.
[L. bos (bov-), ox]

bovine

pertaining to, characteristic of, or derived from the ox or cattle, members of the family Bovidae. See also cattle.

bovine atypical interstitial pneumonia
bovine bonkers
bovine cutaneous angiomatosis
bovine enzootic hematuria
see enzootic hematuria.
bovine ephemeral fever
epidemic bovine abortion
see epizootic bovine abortion.
bovine epizootic fever
bovine exfoliative dermatitis
widespread dermatitis including vesicles on the muzzle in very young calves; recovers sponaneously.
bovine familial convulsions and ataxia
see familial convulsions and ataxia of cattle.
bovine farmer's lung
bovine herpesviruses
bovine herpesviruses 1, 2, 4 and 5. See herpesviridae.
bovine hysteria
bovine immunodeficiency virus
a lentivirus which causes leukopenia followed by persistent leukocytosis when inoculated into calves. The prevalence and significance of natural infection are unknown.
bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency
see bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency.
bovine leukosis
see bovine viral leukosis (below).
bovine lymphomatosis
see bovine viral leukosis (below).
bovine lymphosarcoma
see bovine viral leukosis (below).
bovine malignant catarrh
see malignant catarrhal fever. b. mucosal disease see bovine virus diarrhea (below).
bovine papular stomatitis
see bovine papular stomatitis.
bovine petechial fever
is caused by Ehrlichia ondiri and occurs in Kenya and possibly Tanzania in cattle grazing thick scrub land or indigenous forest areas to 1,500-3,000 meter altitudes. It is manifest by fever and submucosal and serosal hemorrhages. There may be epistaxis and other evidence of a bleeding tendency. Pregnant animals may abort and anemia may result in death 3 to 4 weeks after infection. The disease has a strong similarity to tickborne fever. The method of transmission is unknown. Called also Ondiri disease.
bovine polyomavirus
a virus not known to be pathogenic; up to 60% of cattle sera have antibody to the virus.
bovine pneumonic pasteurellosis
see pneumonic pasteurellosis.
bovine protozoal abortion
bovine pulmonary emphysema
bovine respiratory disease
a group of undifferentiated diseases of young cattle characterized by dyspnea, coughing, nasal discharge, evidence of pneumonia on auscultation of the lungs, and nonspecific signs as a result of the toxemia of infection and tissue destruction. Because of the complexity of the differential diagnosis of these diseases, it has become common practice to devise treatments and control programs which will deal satisfactorily with them as a group. Called also shipping fever.
bovine respiratory syncytial virus
a member of the family Paramyxoviridae, genus Pneumovirus which causes one of the more virulent forms of enzootic calf pneumonia. Many calves in the group are affected, there is severe dyspnea, and extensive involvement of the lungs. Outbreaks of disease also occur in adult cattle. The mortality rate in all ages can be high.
bovine somatotropin (BST)
a protein secreted by the pituitary gland that stimulates body cell growth and milk production. It is available as a synthetically produced product for use in cattle.
sporadic bovine encephalomyelitis
see sporadic bovine encephalomyelitis.
bovine viral leukosis
a highly fatal, systemic, malignant neoplasm of the reticuloendothelial system of cattle. It is characterized by tumors composed of aggregations of neoplastic lymphocytes in almost any organ with a great variety of clinical syndromes resulting. The causative retrovirus is transmitted in a number of ways, including insect vectors, but only to cattle over about 1.5 years of age. There is a significant component of genetic susceptibility in the etiology of the disease and many animals may receive the virus but not become infected. In those that do, the infection persists for life. One group of these cattle are seropositive and may not progress further. A second group are seropositive and develop a persistent lymphocytosis, a benign disease without further progress. The third group is the one in which the cattle develop malignant tumors, lymphosarcomas, and demonstrate any one or a combination of syndromes. These include abomasal obstruction and ulcer, congestive heart failure, posterior paralysis, pharyngeal obstruction, protrusion of the eyeball, and a cutaneous form with multiple nodes and plaques in the skin. There is also a sporadic occurrence in young cattle, a juvenile form in calves less than 6 months old, and a thymic form in yearlings. The disease is always fatal, often within a few weeks. Called also bovine lymphosarcoma, enzootic bovine leukosis.
bovine virus diarrhea
an infectious disease of cattle caused by a pestivirus. Clinical disease is sporadic and is seen only in young animals. The syndrome includes diarrhea, erosive stomatitis and rhinitis, often with similar lesions at all mucocutaneous and skin-horn junctions. Congenital defects occur in the offspring of females which become infected during pregnancy but do not themselves show clinical signs. The best known defect is cerebellar agenesis. Called also mucosal disease.

Patient discussion about bovine

Q. Does cow's milk cause acne? I'm 16 years old guy, and I have acne for several years now. Lately, although I treat it as my dermatologist instructs me, it seems I have more zits, particularly on my face. My friend told it can be because for the last few months ago I've been drinking a cup of milk for breakfast (I almost didn't drink milk at all before that). Is it true? The acne really makes me miserable, and the last thing I want to do is to make it worse. Thanks!!!

A. Regardless of what milk does to your acne, emotional stress can also make it worse, so first of all, try to relax- it'll make feel better and can also make your acne better, so it'll make you feel even better. Try to avoid milk for some time and see what helps you most. No one really proved milk has any influence on acne, so you shouldn't feel like you you're responsible for your acne.

Q. Is soy milk as good as cow milk? what`s good about soy milk and when it should be avoided. Is soy milk as good as cow milk?

A. Remember this, we are the only mammals that drink the milk of another! Do you get the urge to suckle while driving by a farm with cows or goats?
I wish I saved the article from someone I communicated with years ago online from New Zealand. Soy is really NOT a good food source! Please investigate further. Why is it that we are so "milk" conscious? Has the American Dairy Association brain washed us? Good righ, organic grains and veggies are the best food choices!

Q. I'm concerned that my calcium supplements are contaminated w seashells or cow bones. Which brands are best

A. there should be labeled as "from animal source".
here is something that helped me choose:
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/calcium-supplements/AN00964

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