bound

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Related to bounds: leaps and bounds

bound

(bownd),
1. Limited; circumscribed; enclosed.
2. Denoting a substance, such as iodine, phosphorus, calcium, morphine, or some other drug, which is not in readily diffusible form but exists in combination with a high molecular weight substance, especially protein.
3. Fixed to a receptor, such as on a cell membrane.

bound

(bound)
1. restrained or confined; not free.
2. held in chemical combination.

bound

(B, BD) (bownd)
1. Limited; circumscribed; attached; enclosed.
2. Denoting a substance, such as iodine, phosphorus, calcium, morphine, or some other drug, which is not in readily diffusible form but exists in combination with a high molecular weight substance, especially protein.

bound

(bownd)
1. Limited; circumscribed; enclosed.
2. Denoting a substance which is not in readily diffusible form but exists in combination with a high molecular weight substance, especially protein.

bound

said of electrolytes and hormones circulating in the blood, i.e. bound to protein molecules and not immediately available functionally. See also unbound.

Patient discussion about bound

Q. My friend has Progressive MS, he is bound to a wheelchair, Prognosis? How can I help? He must be moved by a Hoyer Lift, he has caregivers. He has a beautiful voice and does have enough ability to move in his chair around local community. He has some bad days with spacicity, I want to help but am unsure as to how? He is 60? or so and lives on his own, he has had MS for many years and a number of complications, such as pneumonia and decubitus. Please help me to help him!

A. There are a number of ideas and resources for social and recreational activities (i.e. wheelchair sports, dancing, travel, aviation, etc.) that may be helpful, which can be found at www.mobility-advisor.com.

More discussions about bound
References in classic literature ?
It is an unfortunate discovery certainly, that of a law which binds us where we did not know before that we were bound.
For though every good author will confine himself within the bounds of probability, it is by no means necessary that his characters, or his incidents, should be trite, common, or vulgar; such as happen in every street, or in every house, or which may be met with in the home articles of a newspaper.
I took leave of my wife, and boy and girl, with tears on both sides, and went on board the Adventure, a merchant ship of three hundred tons, bound for Surat, captain John Nicholas, of Liverpool, commander.
It will not be in the power of the President and Senate to make any treaties by which they and their families and estates will not be equally bound and affected with the rest of the community; and, having no private interests distinct from that of the nation, they will be under no temptations to neglect the latter.
Then he was overwhelmed by numbers, and a few minutes later, bound and guarded, he was carried to The Sheik's tent.
These, like the hired trappers, are bound to exert themselves to the utmost in taking beaver, which, without skinning, they render in at the trader's lodge, where a stipulated price for each is placed to their credit.
The ship, or barque, or brig So-and-so, bound from such a port, with such and such cargo, for such another port, having left at such and such a date, last spoken at sea on such a day, and never having been heard of since, was posted to-day as missing.
The victim finally arrived, bound to the tail of a cart, and when he had been hoisted upon the platform, where he could be seen from all points of the Place, bound with cords and straps upon the wheel of the pillory, a prodigious hoot, mingled with laughter and acclamations, burst forth upon the Place.
When she was touched, she jerked her bound legs and looked wildly yet simply at everybody.
With some difficulty the boy managed to get his knife out of his pocket and cut the cords that bound the riders to one another and to the wooden horse.
And so they bound his hands and feet with thongs of gut and carried him into the hut where Lieutenant Harold Percy Smith-Oldwick awaited his fate.
He lay on his side, the cords that bound his legs so tight as to bite into his tender flesh and shut off the circulation.