bounded

(redirected from boundedly)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to boundedly: boundedly complete

bounded

The limitation of a system’s behaviour to a region of state space; bounded signals cannot have behaviour that approaches infinity.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the face of the inevitable empirical uncertainty that attends consequentialist analysis of the problems posed by boundedly rational consumer decisionmaking, the consequentialist's only possible answer is to demand more data--no matter how futile or unreasonable the demand may be.
jk]} since the multiplication by e-t is bounded and boundedly invertible operator in [L.
tA1], t > 0, is boundedly invertible with inverse
Furthermore, cognitive limitations suggest that entrepreneurs are boundedly rational (Simon, 1957) and exhibit cognitive biases in evaluating an opportunity (Keh et al.
Inter alia, decision-makers are boundedly rational, information asymmetries--both natural and contrived--are ubiquitous, and opportunistic behavior is observable.
A key assumption is that investors are boundedly rational, that is, rational, but with limits on how much they can know.
There we assume that individuals are boundedly rational, and that their expectations are generated in line with a varying parameter Kalman filter on the data set available to them.
The chemical is miscible with diethyl ether and chloroform, boundedly soluble in methanol and ethanol, slightly soluble in glacial acetic acid and practically insoluble in water.
Ellison and Fudenberg's (1995) model of word-of-mouth communication concludes that boundedly rational agents who communicate via word-of-mouth achieve efficient outcomes only if they each receive a little information, suggesting a negative relationship between the quantity of communication and the efficiency of outcomes.
This proposal seeks to develop elements of a new paradigm which (i) explicitly takes into account the existence of various forms of heterogeneous, boundedly rational behaviour in financial markets as well as in goods and labour markets, (ii) investigates the potential of such behaviour to generate bubbles, crashes and a system-wide break down of activity as collective outcomes of individual activities, (iii) investigates the linkages and repercussions between the complex area of financial activity and real economic activity which could be affected by e.
Since TCE assumes economic agents are rational, but only boundedly so due to a variety of uncertainty and transaction costs, it is also consistent with the general objective of firms to produce more with less in order to economize on production, coordination, and adjustment costs.
especially information that is of immediate and direct practical use--for as consumers we are all boundedly rational, and rationally so.