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bounded

The limitation of a system’s behaviour to a region of state space; bounded signals cannot have behaviour that approaches infinity.
References in periodicals archive ?
One is the assumption that behavior is boundedly rational and satisficing.
Boundedly rational individuals may sometimes be aware of their own failings and may take action to correct their behavior, such as when a person throws away a packet of cigarettes to prevent himself from smoking.
161) When individuals are boundedly rational decisionmakers, the best policy response is often to structure choices in a way that helps decisionmakers to maximize accuracy at a realistic level of cost and effort.
Chen, Friedman, and Thisse (1997) have a model of boundedly rational behavior in which the players have a latent subconscious utility function and are not precisely aware of the actual utility associated with each outcome.
of East Anglia, UK)--attempt to account for the existence boundedly rational anomalies of knowledge transfer in economic decision-making.
However, many economic sociologists point out the differences between institutional economics and sociology: economics is based on methodological individualism and the assumption of rational choice (or, at least, boundedly rational behavior), whereas much of sociology is not.
While these heuristics are drawn from psychological studies, they may be supported by economic models with boundedly rational agents (Simon, 1955).
Xavier Gabaix, NBER and MIT, and David Laibson, "Industrial Organization with Boundedly Rational Consumers" Discussant: Barry Nalebuff, Yale University
Following Black (1972), Aldrich (1980), Abramson, Aldrich, and Rhode (1987), and Adkins (2000), I presume that individuals who run for the presidency are boundedly rational actors who act purposively to attain efficiently some goal under conditions of uncertainty and risk.
Technological evolution at this level is likely to be influenced by the boundedly rational decisions of managers (Levinthal and March 1981) and by the structure and culture of the hierarchy (Conner and Prahalad 1996).
It sees behavior as intendedly rational, it sees organizations as products of boundedly rational choice, and it seeks to model all this as clearly and simply as possible.
How, for example, does one distinguish behavior that is boundedly rational from the information-seeking variety?