bougie


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bougie

 [boo´zhe]
a slender, flexible or rigid, hollow or solid, cylindrical instrument for introduction into the urethra or other tubular organ, usually for calibrating or dilating constricted areas.
Bougies: A, Otis bougie à boule; B, olive-tipped bougie; C, filiform bougie. From Dorland's, 2000.
filiform bougie a bougie of very slender caliber, generally used for exploration of small areas, such as sinus tracts, where false tracts could be easily created. The entering end is of smaller diameter, and the following end is threaded to allow for attachment of a following bougie.
following bougie a flexible, tapered bougie attachable to a filiform bougie and allowing progressive dilatation without creation of false tracts.
Hurst b's a series of mercury-filled tubes of progressive diameter used for dilatation of the cardioesophageal region.
Maloney b's a series of mercury-filled tubes of progressive diameter, having cone-shaped tips.
soluble bougie a bougie composed of a substance that becomes fluid in situ.

bou·gie

(bū-zhē'),
A cylindric instrument, usually somewhat flexible and yielding, used for calibrating or dilating constricted areas in tubular organs, such as the urethra or esophagus; sometimes containing a medication for local application.
[Fr. candle]

bougie

/bou·gie/ (boo-zhe´) a slender, flexible, hollow or solid, cylindrical instrument for introduction into the urethra or other tubular organ, usually for calibrating or dilating constricted areas.
Enlarge picture
Bougies: (A), Otis bougie à boule; (B), olive-tipped bougie; (C), filiform bougie.

bulbous bougie  one with a bulb-shaped tip.
filiform bougie  one of very slender caliber.

bougie

(bo͞o′zhē, -jē)
n.
Medicine
a. A slender, flexible, cylindrical instrument that is inserted into a bodily canal, such as the urethra, to dilate, examine, or medicate.

bougie

[bo̅o̅′zhē, bo̅o̅zhē′]
Etymology: Fr, candle
a thin cylindric instrument made of rubber, waxed silk, or other flexible material for insertion into canals of the body in order to dilate, examine, or measure them.
enlarge picture
Passage of a bougie

bougie

Surgery A long, flexible instrument, introduced into the urethra, esophagus, etc, to remove obstructions Therapeutics A slender rod consisting of medicine in a vehicle–wax, gelatin that melts at body temperature, which is introduced via the urethra

bou·gie

(bū-zhē')
A cylindric instrument, usually somewhat flexible and yielding, used for calibrating, examining, measuring, or dilating constricted areas in tubular organs, such as the urethra or esophagus; sometimes containing a medication for local application.
[Fr. candle]

bougie

A smooth, often flexible, round-ended instrument used to widen abnormal narrowing (strictures) in a body passage, such as those in the URETHRA or OESOPHAGUS.

Bougie

A mercury-filled dilator in the shape of a cylinder or tapered cylinder. Bougies come in a range of different sizes.
Mentioned in: Lower Esophageal Ring

bougie

a slender, flexible, hollow or solid, cylindrical instrument for introduction into the urethra or other tubular organ, usually for calibrating or dilating constricted areas.

filiform bougie
a bougie of very slender caliber.
soluble bougie
a bougie composed of a substance that becomes fluid in situ.
References in periodicals archive ?
To measure the urethral stricture length, we inserted a separate bougie into the external and internal urethra, and assembled a disk-like measurer as an attachment to both bougies.
Anastomotic stricture after surgical repair of oesophageal atresia: Frequency, risk factors, and efficacy of oesophageal bougie dilatations.
Le retour au present (B') se fait par une ouverture au noir qui laisse d'abord apparaitre dans le bas du cadre la flamme de la bougie a laquelle le soldat avait allume sa pipe dans le prologue.
These videolaryngoscopes routinely required either a stylet or bougie for tracheal intubation.
Ce debut d'Igitur indique que la construction du langage, a l'instar de l'horloge, est fondee sur la lecture et que la lumiere de la bougie la rend possible.
Visceral aperture was successfully accomplished with over-the-wire (OTW) balloon dilators after 'pre-dilatation' of the primary puncture with over-the-wire plastic bougies.
We're doing extremely well, we've had a really good summer," says Bougie, who attributes their success to loyal customers such as Weyerhaeuser, Hanford Lumber in Rexdale and Leonard Ellen Canada Ltd.
This deal is another major step for Alcan in the realisation of our automotive strategy to be the leading aluminium supplier and strategic partner to the global automotive industry", Jacques Bougie, Chairman and Chief Executive of Alcan, said in a press release.
At the August news conference with Clark, Alcan president and CEO Jacques Bougie chose his words carefully, saying that with this new deal "Alcan has achieved the certainty we need to consider expansion in BC.
I did not know that BUGIA is a style of dripless candlestick, its liturgical use abolished in 1968, named after the wax-rich region of Bougie, Algeria.
The women would squat and with the help of a mirror insert in the cervix a catheter, speculum, sound, pencil, bougie, needle, crochet or button hook.
This is intended for use in bariatric surgical procedures to provide a sized support bougie for sleeve gastrectomy, and to permit stomach decompression, gastric fluid drainage and removal.