botfly


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Related to botfly: human botfly

botfly

 [bot´fli]
an insect of the family Oestridae whose larvae (called bots) are parasitic, especially in horses and sheep. Genera include Oestrus, Gasterophilus, and Dermatobia.

bot·fly

(bot'flī),
Robust, hairy fly of the order Diptera, often strikingly marked in black and yellow or gray, the larvae of which produce a variety of myiasis conditions in humans and various domestic animals, especially herbivores.

botfly

also

bot fly

(bŏt′flī′)
n.
Any of various stout dipteran flies of the family Oestridae, having larvae that are parasitic on mammals, including livestock and sometimes humans.

botfly

(bot'fli?)
Any of several flies of the family Oestridae and other families whose maggots (larvae) are parasitic on the skin of mammals.
See: Dermatobia; myiasis
References in periodicals archive ?
Three cases of ophthalmomyiasis externa by sheep botfly Oestrus ovis in Italy.
The anterior end possesses 2 curved oral hooks, which extend and retract, grasping and tearing host tissues on which the botfly larva feeds (Figure 2).
Only the most extreme urban environments appear to offer a refuge from botflies and birds nesting in habitat with the most natural vegetation also had a refuge from high levels of botfly parasitism.
Botfly ectoparasitism of the Brown Cacholote and the Firewood-Gatherer.
Effects of the parasitic botfly Philornis carinatus on nestling House Wrens, Troglodytes aedon, in Costa Rica.
Eight botfly larvae were observed on a cowbird nestling at 4 days of age with a body mass of 41.
Most botfly species have subcutaneous larvae (Couri et al.
Most studies indicate botfly parasitism produces sublethal (i.
The role of nest-site vegetation on prevalence and intensity of botfly parasitism has received little research attention, except for the work of O'Connor et al.
We examined: (1) seasonal trends in parasite prevalence and intensity, (2) the influence of botfly parasitism on nestling growth and survival, and (3) the association between nest-site vegetation at different scales and probability of botfly parasitism.
The eggs disappeared during incubation at one nest, one nestling disappeared and the other was found dead in another nest, presumably killed by a severe botfly (Philornis sp.