botanical

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botanical

(bə-tăn′ĭ-kəl) also

botanic

(-tăn′ĭk)
adj.
1. Of or relating to plants or plant life.
2. Of or relating to the science of botany.
n.
A drug, medicinal preparation, or similar substance obtained from a plant or plants.

bo·tan′i·cal·ly adv.

botanical

adjective Referring to botany or to the study of plants.

botanical

(bō-tă′nĭ-kl)
1. Relating to botany or plants.
2. A plant extract used to maintain health, treat, or prevent illness.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hexham-based Fentimans claims the inclusion of lemongrass in their botanically brewed tonic, means that a wedge of lemon or lime is no longer required to make a perfect G&T.
Pincushions, botanically classified in the genus Leucospermum, are sprouting up in gardens from Santa Monica to La Canada, desiring little more than well-drained soil to display their global inflorescences and leathery leaves.
We successfully launched a range of mixers, including the world's first botanically brewed tonic water in the autumn of 2007, Fentimans North America Inc.
Because our drinks are botanically brewed with no additives or preservatives, they work particularly well when cooking as the flavour comes through, rather than being lost.
And because of its long evolutionary run, it is the most varied, botanically speaking, of any temperate-zone forest anywhere
The focal point of the story is the rapidly growing market for botanically based medicinal products and Herborium's business strategy as a leading industry innovator.
Plants like holly that have single-sex flowers are known botanically as ''imperfect'' flowers.
A: The purple-flowered Buddleia davidii - buddleja, as it is now known botanically - blooms in summer on shoots which have grown fully the same year and also, to some extent, on older wood.
They are now botanically dendranthema, which include all the florists blooms, or argyranthemum, which includes marguerites, with a few in leucanthemopsis, the moon daisies, Leucanthemum, which includes the shasta daisy and tanacetum which has taken aboard c.
The line flies in the face of the botanically correct faux flowers currently in vogue, but is intended to give furniture retailers inexpensive yet dramatic arrangements to sell.
Here it is reborn as barbed mossy stems bearing up the many flowers, botanically exact and imaginary, spilling giddily across the picture plane.