botanical medicine


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Related to botanical medicine: herbal medicine

botanical medicine

A generic term that encompasses any plant-based therapeutic system, which may be formalised, as in Chinese and Western herbal medicine, or informal, as in folk medicine and ethnomedicine.

botanical medicine

References in periodicals archive ?
One dispensary director and one group of qualifying cannabis botanical medicine receiving patients were enrolled in this study.
We not only need better nutrition and botanical medicines, we crave spiritual nourishment from our food cosmos.
As with all the disorders in this part and subsequent parts, each is discussed in terms of the conventional medical approach to healing and the options to treat with botanical medicine.
Working with the patient's inherent capacity for self-healing, these practitioners employ various remedies, such as nutrition, botanical medicine, homeopathy and stress management.
Adriane Fugh-Berman said at a meeting on botanical medicine sponsored by the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center.
Clinical Essentials and Safetychecker offer healthcare professionals a series of fully referenced monographs on botanical medicine, clinical nutrition, and drug-nutrient interactions and depletions.
Recent expansion of the botanical medicine area has created increased pressure on these plant populations, thus creating a need for the conservation of particular "at-risk" species.
Naturopathy emphasizes the "healing force of nature," and Is a potpourri of many alternative systems, including botanical medicine, homeopathy, acupuncture, nutrition, and Oriental medicine.
The recent past president of the American Herbalists Guild, a founder of the Yale Integrative Medicine program, and the author of seven books on natural medicine for women and children, including Botanical Medicine for Women's Health, The Natural Pregnancy Book, Naturally Healthy Babies and Children, Natural Health After Birth, Vaccinations: A Thoughtful Parent's Guide, ADHD Alternatives (with her husband Tracy Romm, EdD), and The Pocket Guide to Midwifery Care, Aviva was one of the first pioneers in natural birth and botanical medicine for gynecology, obstetrics, and pediatrics in the US.
8-10: American Herbalists Guild 24th Annual Symposium of Botanical Medicine, Bend, OR: 617-520-4372; Email: ahg.
Another chapter provides a comprehensive report on field work in New York City on the use of botanical medicine by Latinos.